Mobile Home Park eviction

Re: Mobile Home Park eviction

Postby totoramona » Aug 10th, 2018, 2:48 pm

JagXKR wrote:Wrong. And this is what you seem to fail to understand. If this was not Locatee land the park would have to give 12 months notice. They got 5. There is a huge difference. It has everything to do with the Locatee owner who does not have to play by the rules of law in BC.


But it IS on locatee land, and everyone there knew it. The arrangement had benefits (low cost, which was admitted!) and drawbacks (fewer legislation). That's what you are failing to consider.

If you choose to work for a non-union company, don't expect union wages.
If you choose to pay for something cash, don't expect a warranty.
etc, etc.
And there is nothing "shady" about locatee landowners "not playing by the rules". That IS the rules. They have different rules.
totoramona
Board Meister
 
Posts: 359
Likes: 330 posts
Liked in: 273 posts
Joined: Nov 21st, 2009, 7:02 pm

Re: Mobile Home Park eviction

Postby alanjh595 » Aug 10th, 2018, 4:31 pm

Purchasing a "mobile home" is always a loss.
1st. A mobile can not be mortgaged. It is "mobile" and can be moved away.
2nd. It is depreciating with age. Just like a brand new car.
3rd. It sits on rented land.
. That makes it as valuable as a new couch delivered to a rental suite.

To compound the devaluation, put it on native land. They have a long history of reneging on their agreements.
If at first you don't succeed, skydiving is not for you.

Tony likes this post.
User avatar
alanjh595
Guru
 
Posts: 7853
Likes: 3074 posts
Liked in: 4012 posts
Joined: Oct 20th, 2017, 5:18 pm

Re: Mobile Home Park eviction

Postby Sparki55 » Aug 10th, 2018, 4:35 pm

alanjh595 wrote:Purchasing a "mobile home" is always a loss.
1st. A mobile can not be mortgaged. It is "mobile" and can be moved away.
2nd. It is depreciating with age. Just like a brand new car.
3rd. It sits on rented land.
. That makes it as valuable as a new couch delivered to a rental suite.

To compound the devaluation, put it on native land. They have a long history of reneging on their agreements.


:130: You get it! Hopefully others are taking notes!
Sparki55
Board Meister
 
Posts: 623
Likes: 435 posts
Liked in: 564 posts
Joined: Feb 24th, 2013, 2:38 pm

Re: Mobile Home Park eviction

Postby totoramona » Aug 10th, 2018, 6:47 pm

alanjh595 wrote:To compound the devaluation, put it on native land. They have a long history of reneging on their agreements.


Generalizations of a derogatory characteristic, based on race, is racism.

In this situation, there was NO reneging on any agreement. Rentals were on a 30 day term.
Some tenants had planned for the possibility that the park would close. Tenants have described enjoying many years of living there. They paid low pad rental and there was no judgment passed on the state of their living unit. Many enjoyed a positive relationship with the landowner and bear no hard feelings.

This is a sad and difficult situation because most of these people have limited means and the Okanagan has an outrageous rental market.
But can we please stop with the racially charged blaming!

Here are some excerpts from an article written in May:

During a visit to the park Thursday afternoon, many of the residents were still upset and shocked at receiving the eviction notices - they have all been ordered to leave effective Oct. 1 - but none appeared to hold any personal animosity against Kruger.

“Fred’s a great guy,” said Len Samuelson, who has lived in the park for almost 10 years. “I’m not happy about what’s happened, but I’m certainly not mad at Fred.”

Len Samuelson said he's loved living for the past decade at the Delta Manufactured Home Park in Penticton. Samuelson and the owners of 40 other properties were given their eviction notices last week and have been ordered to find a new place to live effective Oct. 1. Park owner Fred Kruger told PentictonNow Thursday that the decision to close the park was "deeply regretful", but was simply a business decision.

Delta MHP is home to 40 residences, which include a mixture of mobile homes, trailers and ramshackle structures.

Samuelson said most of the residents at Delta are on pension or fixed incomes and finding another place to live is going to prove very difficult.
“I’ve been calling up and down the valley and there’s just nothing out there,” said Samuelson.
Samuelson said he’s loved living at Delta MHP for the past decade.

“I’ve loved it,” he said. “I’ve had great neighbours and I get along great with Fred, so I haven’t really had any complaints at all. This is very quiet park where most of us get along very well. It’s really sad that we’re all going to have to leave, but I’ve really enjoyed my past 10 years here.”

Samuelson said he’s been living with fibromyalgia for almost 20 years and has had to live on a fixed income ever since.

His pad rent at Delta “is one of the cheapest in the park” as he pays under $400 a month, he said.

Because of the low rent, he’s been able to lead a modest, but happy life and that’s why being evicted has been tough to handle, he said.

“Because of my illness and a bunch of bad luck, I was $20,000 in the hole when I moved in here 10 years ago,” he said. “I’ve managed to get that down to under $6,000 in that time, but now I’m worried again because I don’t think I will ever find a place to live that’s this cheap again.”


Stephen Tozer, 73, who has been living at Delta MHP for four years, also said he’s thoroughly enjoyed his time living in the park.“It’s been a great place to live,” he said. “We’re close to the (Skaha) lake, we get all kinds of sunshine and the park is quiet with all kinds of good neighbours. I’ve loved it here.”

He knows he doesn’t share the same sentiments as many who have been evicted, but Tozer said he understands Kruger’s decision.
“I worked in property development and real estate and I can’t really blame him for what he’s doing,” he said. “That man is doing what anyone would do in terms of ensuring his family’s inheritance remains in good shape.

“I really like Mr. Kruger. He’s a nice man and I’ve never had any reason not to like him. A lot of people are upset, and I don’t blame them, but I personally am not mad at him because he’s always treated me very well.”

Tozer said he’s “luckier than most” in the park because his home can be taken apart in three separate pieces.
“I knew when I committed to this place, that I had better build a place that might have to be moved one day,” he said. “This place operates on a 30-day contract for all the residents. I knew that one day this might happen.”

https://www.*bleep*.com/watercooler/news/news/Penticton/Penticton_mobile_park_owner_deeply_regretful_to_issue_eviction_notices_and_close_the_park/
totoramona
Board Meister
 
Posts: 359
Likes: 330 posts
Liked in: 273 posts
Joined: Nov 21st, 2009, 7:02 pm

Re: Suicides follow eviction notice...

Postby dle » Aug 11th, 2018, 7:04 am

Even Steven wrote:
dle wrote:We need more parks built and I'd like to see the City doing it. Or a co-op. Or a housing authority. All I know is, we don't have enough of them.


Do you really want the city in a housing business? Ready to pay double the tax to make for their inefficiencies and subsidizing a large population base? Cause a lot of people are not.

Trailer parks are great, but there isn't a whole lot of money in them if you start one right now - that's why developers are not building them. The ones you see are been around for a long time and the land has been paid off a long time ago - that's how they can be profitable.




My reasoning is that the we might all recall City has previously basically denounced mobile home parks as being "beneath" us so to speak and trashy, and they don't want to have what they consider to be low class housing. They completely ignore the fact not all our citizens are rich and can afford, or even want, million dollar skyrises. Some people really just want grass (no, not that kind - the kind you mow).

The parks would/could be kept up to the City's satisfaction - ESPECIALLY if they were the "planner, builder, manager" of the parks. They could make sure the upkeep is done, enforce the rules regarding keeping the yards clear of clutter etc. They could have onsite management, ie a strata council, making sure rules are followed etc, just like a condo or townhouse complex. They have to have strict rules, just as do condos.

We simply have to keep in mind that we keep the rents LOW and AFFORDABLE, perhaps some might even require some modest subsidizing, like with a co-op, which the City could oversee or assign. This is NOT to be approached as another dollar signs in the eyes opportunity for some developer in a back room with perhaps Cuban cigars and single-malt. Even for a mobile home park, I'm sure some of them would find a way to cha-ching. Move along folks, no dollars are meant to be made here. This is strictly down-to-earth, good City/community planning.

We have to provide options for housing to our citizens - I don't mean free ride. The owners, or tenants as the case may be, will be paying their rent or mortgage and have lovely, safe, affordable housing.

I am not talking about this being housing for the non-working, addicted, mentally ill etc. That is an entirely different conversation.

These mobile homes are a possible solution to the part of the problem that is no AFFORDABLE housing for us regular people who hold down steady jobs but are making minimum wage at the worst, or even anything less than $25/hr, and can't possibly afford $1800 - $2300 or so just for rent/mortgage. Or for seniors who are trying to live on $1200 per month.

I think there is just no good reason to not explore the option of mobile/manufactured AFFORDABLE housing.

THINKING it's BENEATH us is ridiculous and, well, beneath us!
dle
Übergod
 
Posts: 1819
Likes: 1059 posts
Liked in: 2017 posts
Joined: Nov 14th, 2005, 1:29 pm

Re: Mobile Home Park eviction

Postby alanjh595 » Aug 11th, 2018, 7:24 am

"There's two different laws, on the reserve and off the reserve... and if you're not a native [on the reserve], you have zero grants to stand on," resident Stew English told Castanet.

"Off the reserve, I think they'd have [compensation] to help them relocate. That's what we're asking, that's all we're asking. We're just trying to be calm about it and keep our sanity."

English added many residents won't be able to move their mobile homes because of their age, making them outdated for building safety, and said they will be torn down by the property owners.

"I don't know where I'm going to be living. Right now I'll be out on the street."

The PIB has no formal legislation to help relocate tenants. The mobile home park in question is on locatee lands, and the band said the situation with tenants is outside the purview of staff and council.


https://www.castanet.net/news/Penticton ... ailer-park
If at first you don't succeed, skydiving is not for you.
User avatar
alanjh595
Guru
 
Posts: 7853
Likes: 3074 posts
Liked in: 4012 posts
Joined: Oct 20th, 2017, 5:18 pm

Re: Mobile Home Park eviction

Postby common_sense_guy » Aug 11th, 2018, 8:56 am

Maybe the kids of the people being evicted will do the right thing and let their parents move back in with them. I don't want my tax dollars going towards any program trying to relocate private citizens from the situation that they should have had the foresight to plan for .It sounds cold but my tax dollars are not going far enough already. Look to family and friends for help. not the government please. And there's always go fund me. And correct me if I'm wrong but isn't rent usually cheaper on Indian land because of that. If so they should have been socking that extra money away for the eventuality of what's coming. I was brought up learning that's called preparing for a rainy day.
the smartest person in the room usually isn't the one talking the most but rather talking the least ;)

2 people like this post.
common_sense_guy
Fledgling
 
Posts: 294
Likes: 461 posts
Liked in: 271 posts
Joined: Nov 23rd, 2017, 1:40 pm

Re: Mobile Home Park eviction

Postby zerograv » Aug 11th, 2018, 9:05 am

alanjh595 wrote:Purchasing a "mobile home" is always a loss.
1st. A mobile can not be mortgaged. It is "mobile" and can be moved away.
2nd. It is depreciating with age. Just like a brand new car.
3rd. It sits on rented land.
. That makes it as valuable as a new couch delivered to a rental suite.

To compound the devaluation, put it on native land. They have a long history of reneging on their agreements.


This is incorrect. I bought a mobile in shannon lake on WFN land. I had a small mortgage. My house has increased in price 50% due to land value (oddly enough land value you don't own matters) and a substantial renovation. In the end I doubled my money in 5 years. The lease is with the provincial government on behalf of both parties so there are protections in place.

There are many leased land areas in westbank that had government protection. West harbour, shannon lake, the park down near the bridge, etc. Properly managed property can be a huge money make for first nations bands and offer great lower cost alternatives to the people who live there.
Before giving someone a piece of your mind, make sure that you have enough to spare.
zerograv
Generalissimo Postalot
 
Posts: 977
Likes: 73 posts
Liked in: 287 posts
Joined: Mar 5th, 2009, 9:49 pm

Re: Mobile Home Park eviction

Postby alanjh595 » Aug 11th, 2018, 9:09 am

Was it the increase of land value or the substantial renovation that increased the value? Is there a tax assessment?
If at first you don't succeed, skydiving is not for you.
User avatar
alanjh595
Guru
 
Posts: 7853
Likes: 3074 posts
Liked in: 4012 posts
Joined: Oct 20th, 2017, 5:18 pm

Re: Mobile Home Park eviction

Postby Sparki55 » Aug 11th, 2018, 9:19 am

zerograv wrote:This is incorrect. I bought a mobile in shannon lake on WFN land. I had a small mortgage. My house has increased in price 50% due to land value (oddly enough land value you don't own matters) and a substantial renovation. In the end I doubled my money in 5 years. The lease is with the provincial government on behalf of both parties so there are protections in place.

There are many leased land areas in westbank that had government protection. West harbour, shannon lake, the park down near the bridge, etc. Properly managed property can be a huge money make for first nations bands and offer great lower cost alternatives to the people who live there.


https://www.nolo.com/legal-encyclopedia/is-buying-mobile-home-good-investment.html

Don't spew out terrible investment advice like this. A mobile home is a liability, not an asset. The fact you were able to make money on one shows the demographic who buys them does not understand how property works.

I bet your location has some long lease tied to it, maybe 99 or 125 years. This gives it a false appreciation in value but there will be a depreciation the closer you get to the lease expiration. Land is the only thing which appreciates in value. Ever seen motorhomes or travel trailer values go up? No. All you have is a large travel trailer on someone elses property. Your item depreciates and the land appreciates in value. The only other reason you see a false appreciation is because housing is scarce and your mobile home can be priced just under the price of the cheapest alternative available.

2 people like this post.
Sparki55
Board Meister
 
Posts: 623
Likes: 435 posts
Liked in: 564 posts
Joined: Feb 24th, 2013, 2:38 pm

Re: Mobile Home Park eviction

Postby tnh65 » Aug 11th, 2018, 9:47 am

There is no need write on this forum and blame, I have a easy solution to this problem! I have 5 acres of ALR LAND that produces nothing!! In Summerland that I am willing to set up for these people that need help, rent would be less than what it is now and lesses can be 1 to 5 years or what ever till these people find other alternative, BUT! I need help from mobile home owners to Government to make this happen NOW!! I’m staring Monday morning. If Hogan had any balls it could all happen in 24 hous.

Jflem1983 likes this post.
tnh65
 
Posts: 3
Likes: 0 post
Liked in: 1 post
Joined: Oct 15th, 2015, 9:42 pm

Re: Mobile Home Park eviction

Postby dle » Aug 11th, 2018, 10:07 am

@ sparki55

I guess it all comes down to old sayings such "its worth what the market will bear".

The person who purchases a mobile home, pays a pad rent and leases in a park, lives happily in it for several years, puts it up for sale, walks away from the sale with some jingle in their pockets sold for what the market would bear. If they walked away from it with more than they put into it for whatever reason, then it would seem to be a pretty good deal. Where's the downside? They sold to another person who feels living in a mobile home is just fine and dandy - and a lot of them feel like it's a GOOD monetary decision. The outlay of money is far less leaving more money for LIVING and having some fun. You can renovate if you like, or sell and move on, but if it floats your boat why not?

For all the reasons you state it's a bad investment, the other side of the coin, the one where their sale of it made them some money, means it wasn't that bad of an investment for them after all. It was what they could afford, they were happy, had a roof over their head, and sold for a profit. Maybe it SHOULD play out the way you describe according to the rules of economics, but for whatever reasons the people who sold and made money say their money they made spends just fine.

Of course, if you can AFFORD to buy a house on land you own, or a condo and share the land ownership with others, you stand to make more money, but any "made" money is good!

Bottom line is, both places give you a roof over your head and a place to call home that you can afford. Isn't that a good thing?

I know lots of people who live, or have lived, in mobile homes. I would say 98% of them enjoy it just fine, have bought and sold a few over the years, find them very economical and have made great friends and enjoyed close community ties, and will always continue to live in mobile or manufactured homes. They use their extra money for some travel, dinners out, etc - not break the bank mortgage payments. Some find them great for starting out and then find them a little small and move on to a house after they have saved some money. It all sounds good to me.
dle
Übergod
 
Posts: 1819
Likes: 1059 posts
Liked in: 2017 posts
Joined: Nov 14th, 2005, 1:29 pm

Re: Mobile Home Park eviction

Postby twobits » Aug 11th, 2018, 6:42 pm

tnh65 wrote:There is no need write on this forum and blame, I have a easy solution to this problem! I have 5 acres of ALR LAND that produces nothing!! In Summerland that I am willing to set up for these people that need help, rent would be less than what it is now and lesses can be 1 to 5 years or what ever till these people find other alternative, BUT! I need help from mobile home owners to Government to make this happen NOW!! I’m staring Monday morning. If Hogan had any balls it could all happen in 24 hous.


That is just a fricken amazing idea! I cannot believe that no one with 5 or 10 acres of unused scrub ALR land or otherwise has not thought of this before. When we get a socialist gov't in power, they can pay to put power, sewer, potable water mains, and roads in on that private property. And it would only be for short term leases too!!
And if Horgan had any stones, you would have it all happening in 24 hrs.
For reader interest.....did you vote in the last election and if you don't mind sharing......what party did you support?
Do not argue with an idiot. He will drag you down to his level and beat you with experience.

The problem with the gene pool is that there is no lifeguard.
twobits
Guru
 
Posts: 7086
Likes: 1024 posts
Liked in: 3671 posts
Joined: Nov 25th, 2010, 9:44 am
Location: GPS says Dead Elbow Utah. Think I'm lost

Re: Mobile Home Park eviction

Postby totoramona » Sep 29th, 2018, 11:30 am

https://www.castanet.net/edition/news-story-237841-21-.htm#237841

So the day has come. It is very sad for these people and affordable options are so limited in Penticton that some put themselves right back in the same situation, on PIB land next door. Cheaper than anything else, but not secure.

What strikes me though, is that soon some of these people will truly be homeless. Mayoral candidate Blake recently said he thinks being homeless should be ILLEGAL. What?? And how exactly would that work?
That man clearly lacks reasonable judgment to be Mayor. I sure hope people see that.
totoramona
Board Meister
 
Posts: 359
Likes: 330 posts
Liked in: 273 posts
Joined: Nov 21st, 2009, 7:02 pm

Re: Mobile Home Park eviction

Postby Bunnyhop » Sep 30th, 2018, 12:01 am

alanjh595 wrote:Purchasing a "mobile home" is always a loss.
1st. A mobile can not be mortgaged. It is "mobile" and can be moved away.
2nd. It is depreciating with age. Just like a brand new car.
3rd. It sits on rented land.
. That makes it as valuable as a new couch delivered to a rental suite.

To compound the devaluation, put it on native land. They have a long history of reneging on their agreements.


A mobile home can be put on land you own and it can easily appreciate in value. Not just the land but the building.

In that situation its also possible to get a mortgage on them.

They aren’t the “trailers” that they used to be. Go check out the ones down by Warren Avenue and the bypass. Really nice homes.
Bunnyhop
Generalissimo Postalot
 
Posts: 742
Likes: 1275 posts
Liked in: 535 posts
Joined: Dec 13th, 2009, 7:47 pm

PreviousNext

Return to South Okanagan

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: CommonCrawl [Bot] and 2 guests