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Re: Fruit by the litre?

PostPosted: Sep 15th, 2017, 3:16 pm
by Urban Cowboy
TylerM4 wrote:There was a pact between Canada and US "If you do it I'll do it to". Guess who didn't live up to their end of the deal?


When have they ever? [icon_lol2.gif]

The only reason they've ever played nice with us is because we have stuff they covet.

Re: Fruit by the litre?

PostPosted: Sep 15th, 2017, 3:25 pm
by Catsumi
It just baffles me...I did work as a lab tech in a hospital where everything was measured in metric. So simple, just move the decimal point.

I totally fail to understand peaches, whole, can be sold by the litre, which is a liquid measurement. Is the litre box they are sold in able to contain one litre of fluid? Or did they figure out that x number of peaches mashed down = 1 litre? How can that be considering that the fruit is round leaving a lot of air space (unfilled) in said box.

In order to find if you are paying too much or too little you have to weigh the package and then calculate what the price is per pound or per kilogram.

Like I said, it's bafflegab. A system that surely must benefit someone and not likely the consumer.

I buy loose fruit, weigh and pay. I will not participate in this flumoxxery (new word).!!

I think we are possibly so confused with this half metric, half standard, that retailers can dig a little deeper into our pockets.

Just stop it, I say!
:smt045

Re: Fruit by the litre?

PostPosted: Sep 15th, 2017, 3:45 pm
by whitecandle
Roughly 95% of the world uses the metric system. Canada switched to metric as a means for manufacturing companies to better compete on a global basis.

The litre (SI spelling) or liter (American spelling) (SI symbols L or l, commonly, but incorrectly, abbreviated as ltr) is an SI accepted metric system unit of volume equal to 1 cubic decimetre (dm3), 1,000 cubic centimetres (cm3) or 1/1,000 cubic metre. A cubic decimetre (or litre) occupies a volume of 10×10×10 centimetres (see figure) and is thus equal to one-thousandth of a cubic metre.

The original French metric system used the litre as a base unit. The word litre is derived from an older French unit, the litron, whose name came from Greek — where it was a unit of weight, not volume — via Latin, and which equalled approximately 0.831 litres.

200px-CubeLitre.svg.png

Re: Fruit by the litre?

PostPosted: Sep 15th, 2017, 3:55 pm
by Urban Cowboy
I think it's all a conspiracy inflicted upon us by high fashion models, who'd rather say they weigh 54.4 kilograms, as opposed to 120 pounds. [icon_lol2.gif]

Re: Fruit by the litre?

PostPosted: Sep 15th, 2017, 4:29 pm
by Bpeep
A liter is a measure of liquid, but it is in particular a measure of volume.

Re: Fruit by the litre?

PostPosted: Sep 15th, 2017, 4:47 pm
by TylerM4
Bman wrote:A liter is a measure of liquid, but it is in particular a measure of volume.


Are you just stirring the pot now? There is no such thing as a "measure of liquid".

The easiest way to measure liquid is via volume hence the liter. However, sometimes liquids are measured by weight. LPG (propane) being a good example.

Re: Fruit by the litre?

PostPosted: Sep 15th, 2017, 5:26 pm
by Symbonite
As a person that is in the industry this summer...they call these "Clamshells" anyways they do this so they can sell the bigger better looking fruit per pound...and put the smaller fruit in the clamshells instead of throwing them out. Clamshells really sell well because people just pick them up by the handle and its at a set price.

Re: Fruit by the litre?

PostPosted: Sep 15th, 2017, 5:53 pm
by Catsumi
Sell by the clamshell and I'll pay you with beads, polished stones and seashells! :biggrin:

Re: Fruit by the litre?

PostPosted: Sep 15th, 2017, 7:00 pm
by Bpeep
TylerM4 wrote:
Bman wrote:A liter is a measure of liquid, but it is in particular a measure of volume.


Are you just stirring the pot now? There is no such thing as a "measure of liquid".

The easiest way to measure liquid is via volume hence the liter. However, sometimes liquids are measured by weight. LPG (propane) being a good example.


Actually, I was trying to avoid stirring the pot by agreeing with an earlier poster.
If I said it was a measure of volume someone woulda argued that it was a measure of liquid.

Words.
Pick pick pick.
Measure what you want the way you want.
I have no problems with any measures.
Many do.
Many graduates can't even spell.
I certainly don't expect them to do much else.

Re: Fruit by the litre?

PostPosted: Sep 15th, 2017, 7:32 pm
by Catsumi
Sorry, my bad. Completely overlooked gaseous. One litre equalled Avagadro's number. Still doesn't relate to peaches.

Re: Fruit by the litre?

PostPosted: Sep 15th, 2017, 7:43 pm
by TylerM4
Bman wrote:Actually, I was trying to avoid stirring the pot by agreeing with an earlier poster.
If I said it was a measure of volume someone woulda argued that it was a measure of liquid.


Can't win for losing. :130:

Re: Fruit by the litre?

PostPosted: Sep 16th, 2017, 5:29 pm
by phasyluck
If I actually bought fruit and I saw a litre of solid fruit for X dollars......my mind would instantly go to the how big of a rip off is this really? I guess if people don't fix their brains and do some math, they will keep on finding ways to rinse the consumer. I compare toothpaste prices per ML haha

Re: Fruit by the litre?

PostPosted: Sep 19th, 2017, 12:01 pm
by Green-light
I'm glad weed is sold by weight.
By volume would make the fluffy stuff too expensive.
I like fluffy stuff.

Re: Fruit by the litre?

PostPosted: Sep 19th, 2017, 12:49 pm
by Bsuds
One of the trends in some stores that I disagree with is packaged meat not sold by weight but by the "item".
For instance 4 chicken breasts for $10. I want to know what it is by weight!

Re: Fruit by the litre?

PostPosted: Sep 19th, 2017, 1:14 pm
by Catsumi
Me too when it comes to buying peaches, pears, oranges, etc. I don't want to pay for air.
:admin: