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Re: Noah's Ark

PostPosted: Dec 29th, 2017, 5:47 pm
by averagejoe


I'm not going to read creationist nutjob sites, do you have any actual evidence that a Great Flood happened or that there was a Tower of Babel or that donkeys and snakes talk?[/quote]

Read the articles I posted to answer some of your questions...those aren't creationist sites.

Re: Noah's Ark

PostPosted: Dec 29th, 2017, 6:01 pm
by capleton
averagejoe wrote:


I'm not going to read creationist nutjob sites, do you have any actual evidence that a Great Flood happened or that there was a Tower of Babel or that donkeys and snakes talk?


Read the articles I posted to answer some of your questions...those aren't creationist sites.[/quote]

Nw creation site is not a creationist site? are you kidding me?

Re: Noah's Ark

PostPosted: Dec 29th, 2017, 6:09 pm
by capleton
averagejoe wrote:


I'm not going to read creationist nutjob sites, do you have any actual evidence that a Great Flood happened or that there was a Tower of Babel or that donkeys and snakes talk?


Read the articles I posted to answer some of your questions...those aren't creationist sites.[/quote]

While you are at it, why don't you prove to me that bats are birds, like the Bible says so.

Re: Noah's Ark

PostPosted: Jan 1st, 2018, 10:48 am
by Glacier
capleton wrote:
While you are at it, why don't you prove to me that bats are birds, like the Bible says so.

I'm not familiar with that biblical passage, so I'm only using logic to answer (you and averagejoe should try it too). I would bet that in the ancient world the definition of "bird" was something along the lines of "animals with wings" whereas today's definition is restricted to warm blooded animals with feathers and wings.

Re: Noah's Ark

PostPosted: Jan 1st, 2018, 2:59 pm
by averagejoe
Just reading a book Noah's Flood by William Ryan and Walter Pitman.

Apparently back in the 1840's Austen Layard working for the British Museum was excavating Nineveh the old Capital of Assyria where he found the Black Obelisk (Housed in the British Museum) which gives the history of ancient Israel at the time of King Omri.

But what is more important is the 25,000 clay tablets that were found too. And what is so interesting is that when the these Assyrian clay tablets were translated and they talked about the Great Flood...why isn't this common knowledge?

Image


http://www.bbc.co.uk/ahistoryoftheworld ... cg-yeivrEA

Re: Noah's Ark

PostPosted: Jan 2nd, 2018, 2:22 pm
by capleton
Mesopotamians had a flood story called the Epic of Gilgamesh (every culture that is near water has a flood story of some kind) which is much older then the Bible story, saying that Assyrians had floods recorded doesn't help you much.

Re: Noah's Ark

PostPosted: Jan 2nd, 2018, 2:39 pm
by Glacier
Noah's Flood
Andrew George submits that the Genesis flood narrative matches that in Gilgamesh so closely that "few doubt" that it derives from a Mesopotamian account.[22] What is particularly noticeable is the way the Genesis flood story follows the Gilgamesh flood tale "point by point and in the same order", even when the story permits other alternatives.[23] In a 2001 Torah commentary released on behalf of the Conservative Movement of Judaism, rabbinic scholar Robert Wexler stated: "The most likely assumption we can make is that both Genesis and Gilgamesh drew their material from a common tradition about the flood that existed in Mesopotamia. These stories then diverged in the retelling."[24] Ziusudra, Utnapishtim and Noah are the respective heroes of the Sumerian, Akkadian and biblical flood legends of the ancient Near East.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Epic_of_G ... ah's_Flood