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Hot Water Heaters: Tankless vs Tank?

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Re: Hot Water Heaters: Tankless vs Tank?

Postby amomof2dogs » Apr 12th, 2008, 9:21 am

Hot water Heaters? Why would you want to heat hot water?

Seriously, Is 14 years on a water tank really borrowed time? Our gas water heater is coming up 21 years and if that's true I guess we've been tempting the fates.
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Re: Hot Water Heaters: Tankless vs Tank?

Postby Davegb250 » Mar 7th, 2009, 10:46 am

flüffy wrote:Well the math is pretty straightforward. If I reduce my wall outlet usage from five to one then that's an 80% reduction, right? This 'green' stuff is a snap.



You guys are hilarious. Just so you know, if you plug all your appliances into one outlet, you are still using the exact same amount of energy, its just all being transferred through one circuit. An appliance uses the amount it uses regardless, so plugging 5 appliances into on outlet instead of 5 does not reduce energy use at all, it merely overloads that one circuit, which is most likely a 15amp breaker, which should definetly not be running 5 appliances at once. If you overload it too much, it will pop the breaker. Your energy is not calculated by how many outlets you use, it is calculated by the amount of power that you use, in total. If you are still using all the same appliances, then you are still using the exact same amount of energy. You are a far ways from decreasing your energy use by 80%. If you want to do that, calculate the exact amount of energy all your appliances use when on, and how long they run for, then replace them all with energy efficent models that will knock off 80% usage (good luck with that), get a renewable energy rig (eg:solar) that makes up 80% of your usage (good luck with that also) or stop using your electricity 80% of the time. (good luck with this option also) That is the only way.

Leaving an extension cord plugged in does not use energy if nothing is connected to it. You have to complete a circuit to use energy. You'll notice the end of the cord has to leads on it, one lets energy out, the other takes it back. Without something connected to the end, there is no flow, therefore, no energy is moving, or being used.

I can't figure out whether you people are joking or are just that out of touch with the topic you are speaking on. Tying your cords in knots until they reach the outlet???!!! Whose idea is this? First of all, doing this does not decrease the amount of distance your power has to travel, it merely sends it on a roller coaster ride before it gets there. The length of the cord is not decreased, just tangled into a mess, actually possibly adding resistance to your line which could decrease your performance, not increase it. Its like tying a garden hose in knots and saying you will get more flow from the hose, more water out of the line and have to put less in at the inlet because it is tangled up. I've never heard anything like that in my life, especially coming from someone using it as an example to reduce an energy footprint. Absolutely lmao.
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Re: Hot Water Heaters: Tankless vs Tank?

Postby Bleach » Mar 8th, 2009, 12:39 pm

^ he was joking.(i hope)

i would go for a tank water heat cause there cheap as dirt right now and they have made great strides in saving electricity/fuel and some day the tank less models will be so damn cheap to get and instill it would be worht it. (and when i say "some day" it will must likely be in the next 2-5 years.)
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Re: Hot Water Heaters: Tankless vs Tank?

Postby kay-c » Apr 2nd, 2009, 2:12 pm

Bosch makes a good tankless I have one that is 15 years old and it still keeps up fine. I filled my swimming pool up with it a few times after maintenance approx 32000 gals or 110000 litres at a crack. they charge about $800 to buy one wholesale and $1500 if you want it installed whoever said $2600 got hosed .
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Re: Hot Water Heaters: Tankless vs Tank?

Postby Nibs » Apr 2nd, 2009, 4:47 pm

I have two experiences with tankless water heaters. We had one in England long long ago & I dont remember any problems with it. In Chile, they are pervasive, and the particular model that seems to be infavour is hard to modulate, first its too cold then too hot.
We're lost but we're making good time.
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Re: Hot Water Heaters: Tankless vs Tank?

Postby kibbs » Dec 18th, 2012, 8:12 pm

the nice thing about a tank system is if zombies attack you have a forty gallon storage of fresh water. the reason a tank rusts out after 15 to 20 years b4 and only 10 if your lucky is because the sacrificial anode wears out .if you replace it every 7 years your tank wont rust out . they make them to last just after the warranty runs out now
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Re: Hot Water Heaters: Tankless vs Tank?

Postby Nibs » Dec 19th, 2012, 2:10 pm

Kay-c, here in Mazatlan I saw Bosch tankless propane water heaters for $166. CDN. at Sams Club.
We're lost but we're making good time.
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Re: Hot Water Heaters: Tankless vs Tank?

Postby HoboJo » Dec 20th, 2012, 7:42 am

I have a tankless hot water heater. A Bosch model. I have no problem getting 140F water for ever. I have ran it for several hours at a go, non stop. That is more than a shower or seven.

The trick will be buying a good one. I got mine from FuelPro but it was close to the 5000$ mark.
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Re: Hot Water Heaters: Tankless vs Tank?

Postby Nom_de_Plume » Dec 20th, 2012, 8:00 am

HoboJo wrote:I have a tankless hot water heater. A Bosch model. I have no problem getting 140F water for ever. I have ran it for several hours at a go, non stop. That is more than a shower or seven.

The trick will be buying a good one. I got mine from FuelPro but it was close to the 5000$ mark.

It's a commercial one, and used for commercial purposes.... probably should have specified that.
The trouble with having an open mind, of course, is that people will insist on coming along and trying to put things in it.
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Re: Hot Water Heaters: Tankless vs Tank?

Postby duke98 » Dec 25th, 2012, 9:17 pm

Let's do the math.

From my current gas bill, my average gas usage for hot water only is about $35 per month. The tankless unit may save about 20% of gas in average. That is $7 per month. Usual cost to put a tankless unit is about $3,500. Usual cost of tank system is about $1,000. The difference is $2,500. To get a break even, it takes 357 months which is nearly 30 years. Tankless system lasts longer than tank system but not 30 years. This means that you need to replace it before you can start saving money from a tankless system. Here is the answer.
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Re: Hot Water Heaters: Tankless vs Tank?

Postby Nom_de_Plume » Dec 25th, 2012, 10:46 pm

duke98 wrote:Let's do the math.

It's not actually a math issue but a "needs" issue.
if you need a constant supply of hot water then tankless is the way to go.
If you just need hot water like an average household then maybe it's not worth the expense.
We went tankless because of our needs of lots of hot water all the time, we also had space restrictions and there wasn't a hot water tank small enough for our space requirements but still large enough for our needs.
But then again (as stated above) we are using it in a commercial application.
The trouble with having an open mind, of course, is that people will insist on coming along and trying to put things in it.
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