Thursday, April 24th5.3°C
21725
20654

Okanagan Wolf Kill

Kelowna and Joe Rich topics.

Moderators: Jo, ferri, Merry, Triple 6

Re: Okanagan Wolf Kill

Postby zzontar » Jan 15th, 2013, 1:14 pm

Rwede wrote:

Really. Just making something up doesn't mean it is so.

Rifles are the choice of the majority of hunters, including natives, for gathering food for families in traditional manners.

Hunting is a traditional way of life that is part of our heritage. The method (bow, spear, rifle, muzzleloader, etc) does not change what hunting is.


It's called SPORT hunting for the same reason there is SPORT fishing.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_sports

1.16 Equine Sports
1.17 Fishing
1.18 Flying disc sports
1.19 Football family
1.20 Golf
1.21 Gymnastics
1.22 Handball Family
1.23 Hunting


Regardless, before the invention of the rifle, hunting could be very time consuming and difficult so hunting for sport wasn't too big. Then with the rifle, things like the buffalo massacre could take place (I don't think that would have happened before the rifle) and as killing for fun was so easy, sport hunting began.
They say you can't believe everything they say.
User avatar
zzontar
Guru
 
Posts: 6546
Likes: 1 post
Liked in: 90 posts
Joined: Oct 12th, 2006, 9:38 pm

Re: Okanagan Wolf Kill

Postby Gone_Fishin » Jan 15th, 2013, 1:31 pm

You obviously don't know about the running of huge herds of buffalo over cliffs by natives then, Zzz. Hundreds were killed in a single herding.

And what if I kill a wolf or a deer with my crossbow, a weapon that has existed for 2,000+ years? Traditional enough for you?

The Canadian courts have ruled that the type of weapon used to hunt has evolved along with humans, and makes no difference to the traditional practice of hunting. See any case brought against natives for sustenance hunting - the use of firearms instead of bows and arrows does not change the traditional rights.

And a wiki-list? Are you kidding?
User avatar
Gone_Fishin
Grand Pooh-bah
 
Posts: 2142
Likes: 296 posts
Liked in: 131 posts
Joined: Sep 6th, 2006, 7:43 am

Re: Okanagan Wolf Kill

Postby dirtguy » Jan 15th, 2013, 9:51 pm

Really. Just making something up doesn't mean it is so.

Rifles are the choice of the majority of hunters, including natives, for gathering food for families in traditional manners.

Hunting is a traditional way of life that is part of our heritage. The method (bow, spear, rifle, muzzleloader, etc) does not change what hunting is.[/quote]


Don't bring up the natives with zzontar,it will definitely derail the thread
dirtguy
Fledgling
 
Posts: 250
Likes: 5 posts
Liked in: 10 posts
Joined: Mar 18th, 2007, 7:16 pm
Location: the "rez" b.c

Re: Okanagan Wolf Kill

Postby dorf007 » Jan 23rd, 2013, 6:27 pm

Quote by Bigchief "This is not a conservation matter, nor is it of huge concern to ranchers. The amount of ranchers that lose livestock to wolves is negligible and ranchers genrally take these losses into account."

Yes it is both a conservation matter and a huge concern to ranchers.

As with everything there must be a balance. Too many deer and you have a unhealthy population and they deplete their own food source causing a died off. Too many wolves and they deplete their food source, the deer. There is no predator in the forest to control the wolf population. That is part of the reason there is now a hunting season for wolves.

Ranchers make their living raising and selling livestock (cows or sheep). If a wolf kills a cow then the rancher has lost the revenue he would made from the sale of that animal. He also lost the investment of money and time put in to the health and care of that animal. In simple terms it is money/food he has lost. So imagine if someone took $300 out of your wallet, would that be "negligible" to you; or would you just take the loss into account ?
dorf007
 
Posts: 6
Likes: 0 post
Liked in: 0 post
Joined: Dec 7th, 2008, 11:06 am

Re: Okanagan Wolf Kill

Postby dorf007 » Jan 23rd, 2013, 6:36 pm

[quote="zzontar"][quote="Rwede"]

It's called SPORT hunting for the same reason there is SPORT fishing.

I call it my "'activity". And it is what I choose to do.
dorf007
 
Posts: 6
Likes: 0 post
Liked in: 0 post
Joined: Dec 7th, 2008, 11:06 am

Re: Okanagan Wolf Kill

Postby dorf007 » Jan 23rd, 2013, 6:41 pm

mxtaylor wrote:what a gorgeous looking animal

people should have to hunt them with the same weapons the wolves have.


I wish I could run as fast, see as well, hear and see like them.
dorf007
 
Posts: 6
Likes: 0 post
Liked in: 0 post
Joined: Dec 7th, 2008, 11:06 am

Re: Okanagan Wolf Kill

Postby logman » Jan 23rd, 2013, 7:11 pm

At least 2 wolves were killed last night in the Brown Lake area. Are you even allowed to shoot at night?
User avatar
logman
Generalissimo Postalot
 
Posts: 749
Likes: 12 posts
Liked in: 40 posts
Joined: Apr 9th, 2006, 10:35 pm

Re: Okanagan Wolf Kill

Postby janalta » Jan 23rd, 2013, 7:41 pm

logman wrote:At least 2 wolves were killed last night in the Brown Lake area. Are you even allowed to shoot at night?


It is illegal to hunt at night.
It would then be called poaching.

Natives are exempt in some areas though
Wise enough to know better.
Old enough to care less.
User avatar
janalta
Übergod
 
Posts: 1679
Likes: 16 posts
Liked in: 47 posts
Joined: Jul 14th, 2010, 9:25 pm

Re: Okanagan Wolf Kill

Postby Gone_Fishin » Jan 23rd, 2013, 8:05 pm

logman wrote:At least 2 wolves were killed last night in the Brown Lake area. Are you even allowed to shoot at night?



Is this just a rumour or do you have any evidence? If the latter, please report it to the RAPP line. Poaching is a crime.
User avatar
Gone_Fishin
Grand Pooh-bah
 
Posts: 2142
Likes: 296 posts
Liked in: 131 posts
Joined: Sep 6th, 2006, 7:43 am

Re: Okanagan Wolf Kill

Postby Fancy » Jan 23rd, 2013, 8:14 pm

Aboriginal rights don't extend outside traditional hunting areas and there are restrictions.
User avatar
Fancy
Admiral HMS Castanet
 
Posts: 29146
Likes: 161 posts
Liked in: 513 posts
Joined: Apr 15th, 2006, 6:23 pm

Re: Okanagan Wolf Kill

Postby Graham Adder » Jan 23rd, 2013, 8:16 pm

If you NEED to kill an animal to feed yourself or your family, then a whole new set of rules come into play.
If you NEED to kill an animal to feed yourself or your family, then even trapping is tolerable.

To kill any animal you have no intention of eating, unless in self defense, is wrong.
To kill any animal by a cruel and inhumane means such as traps and snares when it is not a necessity to survival is wrong.

Not one person reading or posting to this forum can manage or conserve wildlife by killing.
Killing needlessly is not a solution to the lack of balance that greed and ignorance has and still is causing.
User avatar
Graham Adder
Lord of the Board
 
Posts: 4315
Likes: 0 post
Liked in: 8 posts
Joined: Apr 14th, 2009, 9:51 am

Re: Okanagan Wolf Kill

Postby wcasako » Jan 23rd, 2013, 8:39 pm

Graham Adder wrote:If you NEED to kill an animal to feed yourself or your family, then a whole new set of rules come into play.
If you NEED to kill an animal to feed yourself or your family, then even trapping is tolerable.

To kill any animal you have no intention of eating, unless in self defense, is wrong.
To kill any animal by a cruel and inhumane means such as traps and snares when it is not a necessity to survival is wrong.

Not one person reading or posting to this forum can manage or conserve wildlife by killing.
Killing needlessly is not a solution to the lack of balance that greed and ignorance has and still is causing.



Thank you for sharing your opinion.

Killing animals is one component of wildlife management - can you provide an example of a species that has been extirpated when managed through science based practices?

Also, whether an animal is put into a human mouth after it is killed has nothing to do with conservation. Once an snimal has been removed from a population, what happens to the carcass is irrelevant to the continued viability of the population. Eating an animal after death is a value decision and everyone is welcome to establish their own values and ethics.
wcasako
 
Posts: 21
Likes: 0 post
Liked in: 0 post
Joined: Sep 23rd, 2007, 9:36 am

Re: Okanagan Wolf Kill

Postby logman » Jan 23rd, 2013, 8:42 pm

A note was left,along with 2 cans of beer, on the grader mans work truck while he was out grading the road. He works only at night and had seen these yahoos out on the roads in he dark during his shift. The note said thank you for keeping the road open and that they had shot A # of wolves. The hours he works away from his pick-up truck are only dark hours. I have seen a few wolves in the area,along with a lot of wolf tracks in recent months.
User avatar
logman
Generalissimo Postalot
 
Posts: 749
Likes: 12 posts
Liked in: 40 posts
Joined: Apr 9th, 2006, 10:35 pm

Re: Okanagan Wolf Kill

Postby Gone_Fishin » Jan 23rd, 2013, 8:50 pm

logman wrote:A note was left,along with 2 cans of beer, on the grader mans work truck while he was out grading the road. He works only at night and had seen these yahoos out on the roads in he dark during his shift. The note said thank you for keeping the road open and that they had shot A # of wolves. The hours he works away from his pick-up truck are only dark hours. I have seen a few wolves in the area,along with a lot of wolf tracks in recent months.



Please ask him to file a RAPP report. If he can give a vehicle description, it may help the COs catch these poachers. Thanks.
User avatar
Gone_Fishin
Grand Pooh-bah
 
Posts: 2142
Likes: 296 posts
Liked in: 131 posts
Joined: Sep 6th, 2006, 7:43 am

Re: Okanagan Wolf Kill

Postby Graham Adder » Jan 23rd, 2013, 9:12 pm

wcasako wrote:Thank you for sharing your opinion.
It's more than an opinion.
Killing animals is one component of wildlife management - can you provide an example of a species that has been extirpated when managed through science based practices?
If you didn't keep messing with nature, you wouldn't need to keep tweaking the mess you've made.
Also, whether an animal is put into a human mouth after it is killed has nothing to do with conservation. I never said nor insinuated that whether or not an animal ends up in a human mouth has anything to do with conservation. Once an snimal has been removed from a population, what happens to the carcass is irrelevant to the continued viability of the population. Eating an animal after death is a value decision and everyone is welcome to establish their own values and ethics. Again, if you would stop playing "The Omnipotent One" with nature, you wouldn't have to keep trying to tweak your way out of the mess your ignorant, selfish and arrogant ideals have created. My values are based around treating the planet and those within it with a level of respect long overdue. Put your science magazines back in the rack and put your ear to the ground. You'd be surprised what you can hear if you only listen.
User avatar
Graham Adder
Lord of the Board
 
Posts: 4315
Likes: 0 post
Liked in: 8 posts
Joined: Apr 14th, 2009, 9:51 am

PreviousNext

Return to Kelowna

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 9 guests