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Another bad native deal

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Another bad native deal

Postby zzontar » Dec 28th, 2012, 6:03 pm

Another deal is struck under the guise that it's good for the natives when in fact, if you look at most all the points it just throws more money at them. They have the choice to work as it will create jobs, but as they can hire anyone from off-reserve and will be getting money coming in from oil, gas, forestry, natural gas, and the Northwest Transmission Line, will there be any incentive to work? Just an idea, why not arrange it so that the band members who work at these projects receive their wages plus a share of resource profits and the ones who can work but won't will receive much less for shares. Another idea would be incentives for years worked as to discourage here and gone employment, or any other work incentives. Education is another issue, they should get a much bigger piece of the pie if they pursue an education than those who don't and are not working.

As it stands now, only just over 1/4 of the Gitanyow are working, and the majority have no education. Giving them enough money to continue this way seems more like a bad deal than a good one to me.

http://www.castanet.net/edition/news-st ... .htm#85137

Agreements made with First Nations
by Contributed - Story: 85137
Dec 28, 2012 / 2:07 pm

VICTORIA - Aboriginal Relations and Reconciliation Minister Ida Chong highlighted the B.C. government's recent successes in reaching agreements that bring benefits to First Nations communities:

"As 2012 comes to a close, I take great pride in the progress we have made in reaching agreements that support the BC Jobs Plan by strengthening relationships with First Nations, while creating a climate where resource industries can flourish.

"Nanwakolas Council president Dallas Smith has spoken passionately about the benefits this approach has brought to Nanwakolas communities on Vancouver Island and the Coast. Through our partnerships and agreements, Nanwakolas has been able to hire a dozen staff to work on the many permitting requests in that region, building capacity within the First Nations and producing certainty for industry."

In 2012, the B.C. government has made great progress in creating certainty for resource development while improving life for First Nations communities and helping them build their economic strength. The following are highlights of the past year, which illustrate our co-operative approach:

* The renewed Nanwakolas Strategic Engagement Agreement increases investment certainty while strengthening Nanwakolas's relationship with the provincial government.

* The Kaska Strategic Engagement Agreement provides greater certainty on how resource development in more than 10 per cent of the province can proceed.

* Economic benefits and oil and gas consultation agreements with the

Fort Nelson First Nation benefits B.C.'s Northeast by establishing a clear process for consultation and management of lands and resources.

* The Haisla Framework Agreement will spur the development of another natural gas export facility in B.C.'s Northwest.

* The K'ómoks First Nation Agreement-in-Principle is a significant step toward a treaty that will bring increased certainty on the land and direct economic benefits to the K'ómoks people and surrounding communities.

* A reconciliation agreement with the Gitanyow Nation will lead to shared decision-making in an area covering 6,285 square kilometres and allow the Gitanyow to explore economic opportunities associated with the development of the Northwest Transmission Line.

* The Nak'azdli Economic Community Development Agreement (ECDA) on mining revenue-sharing creates certainty for the Mount Milligan mine project. With the signing of this agreement, B.C. now has three ECDAs, and further negotiations are underway for more.

* A strategic engagement agreement pilot with 12 Sto:lo First Nations creates a more streamlined consultation process for industry in the

Fraser Valley.

* An incremental treaty agreement with the Nazko First Nation will expand economic development and job creation opportunities, and provide benefits to the First Nation in advance of a treaty final agreement.

* B.C.'s forest consultation and revenue sharing agreements provide economic benefits directly to First Nations communities based on forestry activity in their traditional territories. Since 2010, B.C. has signed nearly 100 of these agreements with First Nations throughout the province.

* The B.C. treaty process is also maintaining momentum, with strong progress at treaty tables across the province. This year saw the Tla'amin community vote in favour of their final agreement, as well as B.C. and Canada signing an agreement-in-principle with the K'ómoks First Nation.

A key part of the BC Jobs Plan is government's commitment to improving opportunities and resources for First Nations to participate in resource activity in their traditional territory. The agreements reached this year underscore an innovative approach that supports economic growth and job creation - not only for the First

Nations involved, but for neighbouring communities. Strengthening government's relationships with First Nations creates benefits for all British Columbians.
They say you can't believe everything they say.
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Re: Another bad native deal

Postby coffeeFreak » Dec 28th, 2012, 9:28 pm

zzontar wrote:Another deal is struck under the guise that it's good for the natives when in fact, if you look at most all the points it just throws more money at them. They have the choice to work as it will create jobs, but as they can hire anyone from off-reserve and will be getting money coming in from oil, gas, forestry, natural gas, and the Northwest Transmission Line, will there be any incentive to work? Just an idea, why not arrange it so that the band members who work at these projects receive their wages plus a share of resource profits and the ones who can work but won't will receive much less for shares. Another idea would be incentives for years worked as to discourage here and gone employment, or any other work incentives. Education is another issue, they should get a much bigger piece of the pie if they pursue an education than those who don't and are not working.

As it stands now, only just over 1/4 of the Gitanyow are working, Can you please post a link?and the majority have no education. Giving them enough money to continue this way seems more like a bad deal than a good one to me.


There are a lot of other issues in the world zz, so why is it that you focus on First Nations issues...the mods shut down one discussion on First Nations, and you open another?

Some of those deals benefit more than the bands, as many projects which will create jobs will now be able to go ahead on reserves where resources would otherwise be inaccessible. No one is "throwing money at them"...they negotiated an agreement to allow resource development to go ahead on THEIR land. They are win win deals.

Why don't you do some research before you start another thread of beaking off about Aboriginal people...jeesh!!
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Re: Another bad native deal

Postby coffeeFreak » Dec 28th, 2012, 10:12 pm

DEBUNKING MYTHS SURROUNDING CANADA’S ABORIGINAL POPULATION

http://www.td.com/document/PDF/economics/special/sg0612_aboriginal_myth.pdf
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Re: Another bad native deal

Postby zzontar » Dec 28th, 2012, 11:51 pm

Here's the link you asked for:
http://www.city-data.com/canada/Gitanyo ... serve.html

... and from that link:

Population in 2006 387

Persons 15 years and over with earnings: 135

Persons 15 years and over with earnings who worked full year: 40


Now tell me how giving them royalty money will get them working. It starts with education, whether old or new ways or both, depending on how they want to live. I see an incentive program as being something to help pull them out of a rut, even if it's making textiles and carvings, but with no incentive it's bound to fail. Perhaps you can offer up a solution you think is better, because just screaming "racist!" every time I mention native issues is getting tiresome.
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Re: Another bad native deal

Postby Ken7 » Dec 29th, 2012, 12:17 am

zzontar

Now tell me how giving them royalty money will get them working. It starts with education, whether old or new ways or both, depending on how they want to live. I see an incentive program as being something to help pull them out of a rut, even if it's making textiles and carvings, but with no incentive it's bound to fail. Perhaps you can offer up a solution you think is better, because just screaming "racist!" every time I mention native issues is getting tiresome.


I do not consider enquiring about where the Canadian Tax dollars are being spent is racist. I find it very interesting how people shy away from anything Native here on these boards or in BC in general.


I tend to agree throwing money at anyone is not going to help them, I could name a few examples from the past where the Government was criticized for doing so. Again in time well hear it, we only helped those who needed help creating a much more serious problem by giving them fun money.
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Re: Another bad native deal

Postby coffeeFreak » Dec 29th, 2012, 12:19 am

zzontar wrote:Here's the link you asked for:Now tell me how giving them royalty money will get them working. It starts with education, whether old or new ways or both, depending on how they want to live. I see an incentive program as being something to help pull them out of a rut, even if it's making textiles and carvings, but with no incentive it's bound to fail. Perhaps you can offer up a solution you think is better, because just screaming "racist!" every time I mention native issues is getting tiresome.


Not sure where you read "screaming racist" in anything I posted here.

I will say, sometimes income is not a good measure because if a person owns their home and lives off the land, a lot less income is required. I can tell you many people I know who live on reserves put a lot of time and effort into gathering, fishing, hunting, preserving and drying food for the winter and stocking up on wood. As for the rest of your conversation, I don't see the news announcement as a problem that needs fixing, but rather as a positive move for all parties involved.
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Re: Another bad native deal

Postby zzontar » Dec 29th, 2012, 11:05 am

coffeeFreak wrote:Not sure where you read "screaming racist" in anything I posted here.

I will say, sometimes income is not a good measure because if a person owns their home and lives off the land, a lot less income is required. I can tell you many people I know who live on reserves put a lot of time and effort into gathering, fishing, hunting, preserving and drying food for the winter and stocking up on wood. As for the rest of your conversation, I don't see the news announcement as a problem that needs fixing, but rather as a positive move for all parties involved.


Some might think that if you have a teen who doesn't want to work, then giving them your hard-earned money will help them as well, but I disagree.
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Re: Another bad native deal

Postby zoo » Dec 29th, 2012, 12:04 pm

Hey, we should just keep dealing with this in the same way. Its proven not to be working for any parties involved and in the long run we will have such a division between Canada's people. Think how cool it will be to have different governments, laws, rules, peoples, schools, hospitals, etc, etc. I mean think of how great our country will be when we are all different and treated different. How each of us can scream "foul" for not being treated different and getting funds to support it. Not to mention the pure cost of it will help sink Canada financially . Shouldn't be too much longer.
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Re: Another bad native deal

Postby the truth » Dec 29th, 2012, 1:49 pm

"zzontar"]
coffeeFreak wrote:Not sure where you read "screaming racist" in anything I posted here.

I will say, sometimes income is not a good measure because if a person owns their home and lives off the land, a lot less income is required. I can tell you many people I know who live on reserves put a lot of time and effort into gathering, fishing, hunting, preserving and drying food for the winter and stocking up on wood. As for the rest of your conversation, I don't see the news announcement as a problem that needs fixing, but rather as a positive move for all parties involved.


Some might think that if you have a teen who doesn't want to work, then giving them your hard-earned money will help them as well, but I disagree.[/quote]

what is racist is the second a non native person wants to talk about something native,you people pull the race card and the thread gets locked
now thats racist
i will always speak the truth
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Re: Another bad native deal

Postby cutter7 » Dec 29th, 2012, 8:24 pm

Some might think that if you have a teen who doesn't want to work, then giving them your hard-earned money will help them as well, but I disagree.[/quote]

what is racist is the second a non native person wants to talk about something native,you people pull the race card and the thread gets locked
now thats racist
i will always speak the truth

hahaha! is that like someone talking about police and being labeled a police basher?
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Re: Another bad native deal

Postby bob vernon » Dec 29th, 2012, 10:43 pm

You people?
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Re: Another bad native deal

Postby Ken7 » Dec 29th, 2012, 10:53 pm

zoo wrote:Hey, we should just keep dealing with this in the same way. Its proven not to be working for any parties involved and in the long run we will have such a division between Canada's people. Think how cool it will be to have different governments, laws, rules, peoples, schools, hospitals, etc, etc. I mean think of how great our country will be when we are all different and treated different. How each of us can scream "foul" for not being treated different and getting funds to support it. Not to mention the pure cost of it will help sink Canada financially . Shouldn't be too much longer.



I think currently we have three, Canadians, Quebequa, and our Native Canadians.

If they settle the treaties fairly and seperate we'd be ahead of where we are currently!!
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Re: Another bad native deal

Postby zoo » Dec 29th, 2012, 11:41 pm

[/quote]


I think currently we have three, Canadians, Quebequa, and our Native Canadians.

If they settle the treaties fairly and seperate we'd be ahead of where we are currently!![/quote]

It would be good for sure. that being said they have tried before...
No amount of money can ever satisfy the demand.
Your right you've listed 3 above, but in the years to come there will be a few more.
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Re: Another bad native deal

Postby Graphite » Dec 29th, 2012, 11:46 pm

cutter7 wrote: is that like someone talking about police and being labeled a police basher?


No, someone who bashes the police is a police basher.
Last edited by Graphite on Dec 29th, 2012, 11:48 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Another bad native deal

Postby Graphite » Dec 29th, 2012, 11:47 pm

bob vernon wrote:You people?


No doubt.
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