They fought for our freedom

Re: They fought for our freedom

Postby maryjane48 » Jul 24th, 2017, 8:15 pm

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Re: They fought for our freedom

Postby maryjane48 » Jul 25th, 2017, 3:13 pm

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Re: They fought for our freedom

Postby maryjane48 » Jul 25th, 2017, 3:21 pm

Pat-Taporter wrote:For maryjane48, the McKenna film the Battle of Hong Kong - A Savage Christmas 1941.


thanks for posting but im not ready to watch it yet . when i started to read the book about them canadian pow there , i couldnt finish , all i could think about how they were treated and it made me physicaly ill .
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Re: They fought for our freedom

Postby cutter7 » Aug 8th, 2017, 7:18 pm

my birth father was a sniper in the war, he doesn't like to talk about it, he is very old but still not proud at all

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Re: They fought for our freedom

Postby Busdriver1964 » Aug 9th, 2017, 1:58 am

Times have changed
Do yo think these men.............No.......... No ...........Kids knew the out come of there actions.easy to say today.. ..,Kids would you send your 18 year old out today.. These Kids gave there lives for family friends and country,
DISREPECT that and yo do not deserve to live in this country or any free country.

What the politicians have done to this country.. Make them responsible ....

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Re: They fought for our freedom

Postby sobrohusfat » Sep 10th, 2017, 12:29 pm

one more day... 1918.jpg
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Re: They fought for our freedom

Postby sobrohusfat » Sep 17th, 2017, 4:41 pm

Taken from the Daily News Joliet Ill. Wed. June 14, 1911

JACOB MILLER
Braidwood Veteran Carried Bullet in Head For Many Years After War

Story of Vicissitudes of the Veteran, Left on the field of Battle as Dead

Braidwood is sending to the state G.A.R. encampment today one of the most remarkable hero survivors of the Civil War. His name is Jacob Miller and since Sept. 19, 1863, he has lived with an open bullet wound in his forehead. For a number of years the bullet remained in his head but piece by piece it fell out till now. It is thought none of it remains in the wound.

During the time it was in the head it at times would produce a stupor, which sometimes would last two weeks, it being usually when he caught cold and produced more of a pressure on the brain. At other times delirium would seize him and he would imagine himself again on picket duty and would tramp back and forth on his beat, a stick on his shoulder for a musket, a pitiful object of the sacrifice for freedom. As these pieces of lead gradually loosened and fell out he regained his usual health and is now at the age of 78 years, one of the most, if not the most, remarkable survivor of the Civil war.

The harrowing experience undergone by Mr. Miller is so vividly felt by him even at this late day that it is seldom he can be persuaded to talk of it. But it is my privilege to record from his own hand writing written for his family the story of his miraculous escape from death at that memorable time under his signature.

Chickamauga.jpg


"I was wounded in the head near Brock Field at the battle of Chickamagua, Georgia on the morning of Sept. 19, 1863. I was left for dead when my company fell back from that position. When I came to my senses some time after I found I was in the rear of the confederate line. So not to become a prisoner I made up my mind to make an effort to get around their line and back on my own side. I got up with the help of my gun as a staff, then went back some distance, then started parallel with the line of battle. I suppose I was so covered with blood that those that I met, did not notice that I was a Yank, ( at least our Major, my former captain did not recognize me when I met him after passing to our own side).

At last I got to the end of the confederate line and went to our own side while a brigade of confederates came up to their line behind me. There were none of the Union forces found on that part of the field when I passed along. I struck an old by-road and followed it the best I could, as by this time my head was swelled so bad it shut my eyes and I could see to get along only by raising the lid of my right eye and look ahead then go on till I ran afoul of something, then would look again and so on till I came to the Lafayette Pike near the Kelly house and started towards the field Hospital at the springs. I at length got so badly exhausted I had to lie down by the side of the road. At last some bearers came along and put me on their stretcher and carried me to the hospital and laid me on the ground in a tent.

A hospital nurse came and put a wet bandage over my wound and around my head and gave me a canteen of water. I don’t know what time of day they examined my wound and decided to put me on the operating table till after dark some time. The surgeons examined my wound and decided it was best not to operate on me and give me more pain as they said I couldn’t live very long, so the nurse took me back into the tent. I slept some during the night . The next morning (Sunday), the doctors came around to make a list of the wounded and of their company and regiments and said to send all the wounded to Chattanooga that the ambulances would carry and told me I was wounded too bad to be moved, and if the army fell back those that were left there could afterwards be exchanged.

As stated before I made up my mind as long as I could drag one foot after another I would not allow myself to be taken prisoner. I got a nurse to fill my canteen with water so I could make an effort in getting near safety as possible. I got out of the tent without being noticed and got behind some wagons that stood near the road till I was safely away (having to open my eye with my finger to take my bearings on the road) I went away from the boom of cannon and the rattle of musketry. I worked my way along the road as best I could. At one time I got off to the side of the road and bumped my head against a low hanging limb. The shock toppled me over, I got up and took my bearings again and went on as long as I could drag a foot then lay down beside the road, to see if I could not rest so I could move.

I hadn’t lain long till the ambulance train began to pass, the drivers as they passed me asked me if I was still alive, then passing on. At last one of the drivers asked if I was alive and said he would take me in, as one of his men had died back awes, and he had taken him out. Then it was all a blank to me, (Monday the 21st I came to myself and found I was in a long building in Chattanooga Tenn., lying with hundreds of other wounded on the floor almost as thick as hogs in a stock car. Some were talking , some were groaning. I raised myself to a sitting position got my canteen and wet my head. While doing it I heard a couple of soldiers who were from my company. They could not believe it was me as they said I was left for dead on the field at the left of Brock Cabin. They came over to where I was and we visited together till then came an order for all the wounded that could walk to start across the river on a pontoon bridge to a hospital, to be treated ready to be taken to Nashville. I told the boys if they could lead me, I could walk that distance. I started but owing to our army retreating the night before, and was then in and around the city wagon trains. Troops and artillery were crossing the river on the single pontoon bridge. We could not get across until almost sundown.

When we arrived across and up on the bank we luckily ran across our company teamster, who we stopped with that night He got us something to eat After we ate some (the first I had tasted before daylight Saturday morning the 19th), we lay down on a pile of blankets, each fixed under the wagon and rested pretty well as the teamsters stayed awake till nearly morning to keep our wounds moist with cool water from a nearby spring.

Tuesday morning the 22nd we awoke to the crackling of the camp fire that a comrade built to get us a cup of coffee and a bite to eat of hard tack and fat meat. While eating, an orderly rode up and asked if we were wounded. If so we were to go back along the road to get our wounds dressed, so we bid the teamsters good-bye and went to get our wounds attended to. We had to wait till near noon before we were attended to.

That was the first time I had my wound washed and dressed by a surgeon. After we were fixed up we drew a few crackers, some sugar coffee, salt and a cake of soap and were ordered to get into an army wagon with four army mules, ( God Bless the army mule, the soldiers friend.) We got in and started to go over Raccoon or Sand Mountain to Bridgeport, Ala. To take the train to Nashville, Tenn. After riding in the wagon awhile I found the jolting hurt my head so badly I could not stand it so had to get out. My comrades got out with me and we went on foot. I was told it was 60 miles that route to Bridgport, at least it took us four days to get there.

Wednesday morning when I woke up I found I could open my right eye and see to get around. We arrived at Bridgeport the fourth day out from Chattanooga at noon, just as a train of box cars were ready to pull out. I got in a car and lay down. I had gained my point so far--and how. As the soldiers term it with lots of sand, but the sand had run out with me for the time being.

The next thing I remember I was stripped and in a bath tub of warm water in a hospital at Nashville. I do not know what date it was; in fact I didn’t pay much attention to the dates from the Friday at noon when I got in the box car at Bridgeport to start to Nashville.

After, some length of time I was transferred to Louisville , Ky. From there to New Albany, Ind.. In all the hospitals I was in I begged the surgeons to operate on my head but they all refused.

I suffered for nine months then I got a furlough home to Logansport and got Drs. Fitch and Colman to operate on my wound. They took out the musket ball. After the operation a few days, I returned to the hospital at Madison and stayed there till the expiration of my enlistment, Sept. 17, 1864. Seventeen years after I was wounded a buck shot dropped out of my wound and thirty one years after two pieces of lead came out.

Some ask how it is I can describe so minutely my getting wounded and getting off the battle field after so many years. My answer is I have an everyday reminder of it in my wound and constant pain in the head, never free of it while not asleep. The whole scene is imprinted on my brain as with a steel engraving.

I haven’t written this to complain of any one being in fault for my misfortune and suffering all these years, the government is good to me and gives me $40.00 per month pension."

Jacob Miller,
formerly a private in company K 9th Indiana Vol. Inf.



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Re: They fought for our freedom

Postby sobrohusfat » Sep 26th, 2017, 9:39 am

"Get your facts first, then you can distort them as you please." - Mark Twain

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Re: They fought for our freedom

Postby maryjane48 » Nov 3rd, 2017, 6:07 am

Dawson Creek, British Columbia — It was a small force: just 1,800 men. And yet, during the Second World War, it earned a level of respect that belied its size by taking several difficult objectives others could not.
The unit was also highly secret. When it was disbanded in 1944, the surviving members were told in no uncertain terms to take their stories to the grave with them.
This was the First Special Service Force (FSSF), an elite group of Canadian and American soldiers that is now recognized as the precursor to contemporary special force units such as Canada’s Joint Task Force 2 and the U.S. Army’s Green Berets. It was also known as “The Devil’s Brigade” – so-named because, as legend has it, a German officer called them ”The Black Devils” in his journals.


https://www.facebook.com/notes/canadian ... 769077463/
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Re: They fought for our freedom

Postby maryjane48 » Nov 5th, 2017, 1:03 pm

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Re: They fought for our freedom

Postby sobrohusfat » Nov 7th, 2017, 7:51 pm

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Re: They fought for our freedom

Postby alanjh595 » Nov 11th, 2017, 8:03 am

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If at first you don't succeed, skydiving is not for you.

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Re: They fought for our freedom

Postby alanjh595 » Nov 11th, 2017, 8:08 am

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If at first you don't succeed, skydiving is not for you.
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Re: They fought for our freedom

Postby alanjh595 » Nov 11th, 2017, 8:09 am

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If at first you don't succeed, skydiving is not for you.

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Re: They fought for our freedom

Postby Blast » Jan 10th, 2018, 9:06 am

So now we know, from the Minister's mouth, that the Liberals lied during the election campaign.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-c ... -1.4480013
Veterans Affairs minister responds to pension change critics - CBC - 9 Jan 18
"I won’t go back to the Pension Act of 1919", says federal minister Seamus O'Regan

Veteran Affairs Minister Seamus O`Regan is in British Columbia this week to talk about the pension plan changes for veterans announced last month.

The federal government promised in the 2015 election to reinstate lifetime pensions for injured veterans.

Those were abolished in 2006 and replaced by lump-sum payments.

Under changes announced last month, former soldiers can still choose to receive a lump sum of up to $360,000 or they can choose to receive a lifetime pension instead of up to $1,150 a month.

The most severely disabled veterans can also get an additional monthly allowance of up to $1,500.

In an interview with On the Island guest host Khalil Akhtar, O'Regan responded to criticism of the new plan.

What's your response to the National Council of Veterans Associations' criticism the monthly pension for veterans remain lower than in 2006? (see post above)

The maximum monthly payment will indeed be slightly increased for those people with a 100 per cent disability.

We'd heard from veterans organizations that said, and that still say to me as I go around talking to people about this new pension-for-life proposal, that it was never really about the money, it was about the services.

"Now, we have all these services in place. The lump sum, though, was a real thorn in a lot of people's sides. Because it felt like they were being written off, written off the ledger, you know, here's your money, now go away.

What we're offering here is the ability to take that by the month at an increased and far more generous rate."

The NCVA says veterans with the same injuries receive different compensation levels if one fought before 2006 and one was injured after 2006: Up to $2,733 a month under the old pensions, compared to a maximum of $2,600 under the new plan. What do you make of that point?

It's an argument that was had in 2006, over the New Veterans Charter. We are building on an agreement that was made by all parties and many veterans groups back in 2006.

There is a short window there where you did have an overlap, where you had men and women who were fighting side-by-side in Afghanistan, some who would fall under the Pension Act of 1919 and some who would fall under the New Veterans Charter. That is absolutely true.

With the increased benefits that we're allowing right now, we're going back to those people who received those lump sum payments, 2006 and after, and we are going to calculate how much they would have received if they had those new benefits when they accepted that amount.

Then we subtract the lump sum that we've given them and give them the rest over monthly payments. I mean, for some people, this could be a substantial amount of money.

The new program won't come into effect until April 1, 2019. Why is it taking so long? Why not this year?

Partially related to another subject, and that's Phoenix (the federal government's troubled pay system). Laying out very specialized financial compensation to thousands of people we, you know, now know can be very complicated work. :rofl:

There's also a legislative agenda. We're already under the gun, I can tell you, to make sure this legislation gets drafted.

Some veterans who voted for the Liberals did so thinking the disparity between the old system and the new one would be adressed. What do you say to veterans who feel let down by your new plan?

I won't go back to the Pension Act of 1919. It did not meet the needs of our veterans. That's what we heard in 2006.

That's why every political party in Parliament agreed to this. We focus on rehabilitative services. We focus on the ability of people getting back to meaningful work because I know first hand, in my own experience, that there is nothing better than meaningful work.

This interview has been edited and condensed.



IMHO ******* Lies from the Minister. "That's what we heard in 2006" What about everything "heard" and the legal case since 2006? What did the LPC campaign on last election - a return to life long pensions (LLP) because they "heard" from Veterans the LLP was equitable and justified.

Add: Trudeau and the LPC had no intention of bring back LLP. It was just something to hit Harper on for the election. Trudeau has no intent now.
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