51141
52223

DCT Chambers safety???

Home of the traffic rant.

Re: DCT Chambers safety???

Postby LTD » Jan 7th, 2018, 6:13 pm

re torqueing wheels on a new vehicle would be part of the pre delivery inspection they do before you pick up your shiny new ride and doing a re torque should be mandatory any time you remove a wheel after losing a set of duals on a logging road at a high rate of speed I re torque a couple times just to make sure.
LTD
Lord of the Board
 
Posts: 3042
Likes: 2076 posts
Liked in: 2213 posts
Joined: Mar 31st, 2010, 2:34 pm

Re: DCT Chambers safety???

Postby generalposter » Jan 7th, 2018, 6:48 pm

dirtybiker wrote:
lightspeed wrote:
Using the footbrake coming down a hill. [icon_lol2.gif]

Figure it out.....


So, why not just a simple explanation of what your trying to get across in the stead
of playing riddler ?


The explanation for not giving the explanation is not knowing the explanation in order to give the explanation. I hope that answers your question without further explanation.

LTD likes this post.
generalposter
Fledgling
 
Posts: 238
Likes: 41 posts
Liked in: 277 posts
Joined: Oct 16th, 2011, 8:49 am

Re: DCT Chambers safety???

Postby daveandanne » Jan 7th, 2018, 9:29 pm

As to the standard torque set by industry standards who second inspects this and say they were torqued to 110 ft. pounds and then you manually use the hand tool and you have it set at the standard 90 ft. pounds would they not remain at 110 ft. pounds as the manual one clicks out at the 90 ft. pounds? Anyone have an answer to this over torqueing as the manual one would not pick this up to subtract this. So if they remain over torqued there is the shear problem when overheated on the studs.
daveandanne
 
Posts: 68
Likes: 0 post
Liked in: 11 posts
Joined: Jun 24th, 2014, 9:32 am

Re: DCT Chambers safety???

Postby LTD » Jan 7th, 2018, 9:35 pm

the studs don't get overheated yes can over torque them and stretch them a 110 when it should be 90 isn't enough to cause a problem even a brake fire wouldn't be hot enough to have an effect on the studs

by the way the torque on those wheels is between 400 and 500 foot pounds

dirtybiker likes this post.
LTD
Lord of the Board
 
Posts: 3042
Likes: 2076 posts
Liked in: 2213 posts
Joined: Mar 31st, 2010, 2:34 pm

Re: DCT Chambers safety???

Postby daveandanne » Jan 7th, 2018, 9:44 pm

I mean when the studs get overheated when they are over torqued and there is a tire fire or hot brake drum issue. In the tire fire one they take the wheel off and replace the tire and in the hot brake drum event they do not unless there is a fire.
daveandanne
 
Posts: 68
Likes: 0 post
Liked in: 11 posts
Joined: Jun 24th, 2014, 9:32 am

Re: DCT Chambers safety???

Postby LTD » Jan 7th, 2018, 9:51 pm

the studs don't get overheated, unless you were to take a torch to them
LTD
Lord of the Board
 
Posts: 3042
Likes: 2076 posts
Liked in: 2213 posts
Joined: Mar 31st, 2010, 2:34 pm

Re: DCT Chambers safety???

Postby daveandanne » Jan 7th, 2018, 9:57 pm

Just try touching a trailer overheated drum when super hot and as the studs are attached to them you will feel what I mean and do this very fast if you do not want to go to the hospital.
daveandanne
 
Posts: 68
Likes: 0 post
Liked in: 11 posts
Joined: Jun 24th, 2014, 9:32 am

Re: DCT Chambers safety???

Postby dodgerdodge » Jan 7th, 2018, 9:57 pm

LTD wrote:re torqueing wheels on a new vehicle would be part of the pre delivery inspection they do before you pick up your shiny new ride and doing a re torque should be mandatory any time you remove a wheel after losing a set of duals on a logging road at a high rate of speed I re torque a couple times just to make sure.


Maybe that is the case i don't know but if the dealer checks wheel torque on a new vehicle why doesn't he also re torque after wheel off jobs? Seems a bit backwards to me. Either they feel its necessary to check or they don't.
On a big rig i would think it is definitely a good thing

dirtybiker likes this post.
dodgerdodge
Übergod
 
Posts: 1451
Likes: 98 posts
Liked in: 351 posts
Joined: Jun 9th, 2010, 6:35 am

Re: DCT Chambers safety???

Postby LTD » Jan 7th, 2018, 10:00 pm

daveandanne wrote:Just try touching a trailer overheated drum when super hot and as the studs are attached to them you will feel what I mean and do this very fast if you do not want to go to the hospital.

that's no where near hot enough to have any effect on the metallurgy of a wheel stud you have no idea what your talking about
LTD
Lord of the Board
 
Posts: 3042
Likes: 2076 posts
Liked in: 2213 posts
Joined: Mar 31st, 2010, 2:34 pm

Re: DCT Chambers safety???

Postby LTD » Jan 7th, 2018, 10:03 pm

dodgerdodge wrote:
LTD wrote:re torqueing wheels on a new vehicle would be part of the pre delivery inspection they do before you pick up your shiny new ride and doing a re torque should be mandatory any time you remove a wheel after losing a set of duals on a logging road at a high rate of speed I re torque a couple times just to make sure.


Maybe that is the case i don't know but if the dealer checks wheel torque on a new vehicle why doesn't he also re torque after wheel off jobs? Seems a bit backwards to me. Either they feel its necessary to check or they don't.
On a big rig i would think it is definitely a good thing

technically its up to you to have it done I can honestly say ive never had a dealership that didn't tell me to re torque but I get what youre saying
LTD
Lord of the Board
 
Posts: 3042
Likes: 2076 posts
Liked in: 2213 posts
Joined: Mar 31st, 2010, 2:34 pm

Re: DCT Chambers safety???

Postby dirtybiker » Jan 7th, 2018, 11:08 pm

Big difference betwixt a passenger vehicle, single wheel configuration and
a Commercial Vehicle running duals.
Present wheel mount systems have what is called Uni Mount wheels.
10 studs that pass through both wheels with washered nuts to secure.

To clarify and help with comprehension to my poorly written word.

The air wrench used to make speedier work should not be set any higher than 400.
Then the manual torque wrench is used to take the nuts up to specified values, not down.

The biggest thing I have noticed over the years is that the washers and threads on the nuts not being
lubricated EVERY time they are re and re'd.
This simple procedure helps assure a consistent, even, torque across all 10.

I am also one for personal peace of mind, who assists in final torque, and later, retorque
even just to hold the wrench to place the socket on each nut.

I also personally oil each and every washered nut, every time.

Not even getting into the issues presented when mixing alloys with metals.

No I am not a tire guy, I just try to know the most I can about my rig.
This is not taught, it is learned by honing ones craft..
Something I'm sad to say, is sorely lacking in todays world.

ETA: I hope this helps.
"Don't 'p' down my neck then tell me it's raining!"
dirtybiker
Guru
 
Posts: 6150
Likes: 4772 posts
Liked in: 2562 posts
Joined: Mar 8th, 2008, 6:00 pm
Location: Central OK

Re: DCT Chambers safety???

Postby daveandanne » Jan 8th, 2018, 9:24 am

Well spoken Dirty Biker. Most of us dummies do not know the torque rules and you look like you know what you are doing and do it right. We are all speculating as to why these commercial trucks, well inspected of course, are having these troubles. No more need to talk about heat fatigue, sheared bolts and the make of the drums. So if we now cut to the chase these dangerous wheels and rims came off period. So now they must have come off because there was nothing holding them on. Now we await the experts to explain why they came off. I wish everything was this simple to have us know about it. Keep up your excellent work ethics Dirty Biker and your knowledge helps us understand the issues involved in trucking and wheel maintenance.
daveandanne
 
Posts: 68
Likes: 0 post
Liked in: 11 posts
Joined: Jun 24th, 2014, 9:32 am

Re: DCT Chambers safety???

Postby dirtybiker » Jan 8th, 2018, 11:55 am

The long and the short of it,

Someone missed something !

It does not happen often, but it does still happen.
"Don't 'p' down my neck then tell me it's raining!"
dirtybiker
Guru
 
Posts: 6150
Likes: 4772 posts
Liked in: 2562 posts
Joined: Mar 8th, 2008, 6:00 pm
Location: Central OK

Re: DCT Chambers safety???

Postby Bsuds » Jan 8th, 2018, 11:58 am

dirtybiker wrote:It does not happen often, but it does still happen.


It probably happens more than we know. (or want to know)
Nowadays it's almost rude to ask a question without Googling it first!
User avatar
Bsuds
The Wagon Master
 
Posts: 41650
Likes: 7755 posts
Liked in: 9816 posts
Joined: Apr 21st, 2005, 9:46 am

Re: DCT Chambers safety???

Postby 60-YEARS-in-Ktown » Jan 9th, 2018, 11:09 pm

johnny24 wrote:
daveandanne wrote:What are brake drums made of ? I thought they were made of Ferro Manganese Steel not ordinary steel as it cannot take the heat and they warp when overheated.


Ferro Manganese isn't steel, but I've only heard of using cast iron or aluminum.


Steel is a poor brake drum material, cast iron has a better coefficent of friction I think ...at any rate usually cast iron.
And I am thinking nodular iron maybe. This you could tell if they were being turned, they would try to form curled chips, which may crumble if you hit them. Regular cast iron, the material comes off in a powdery form.
When the drums over heated, are the studs turning straw color or brown or blue. ..? If they are not changing color it did not affect the heat treatment. You mention tempering... tempering is a process done AFTER Heat Treating. Heat Treating makes it hard and brittle, tempering after that reduces hardness and increases toughness.
I'd like to help You OUT,
Which way did You come in??

dirtybiker likes this post.
User avatar
60-YEARS-in-Ktown
Lord of the Board
 
Posts: 3519
Likes: 371 posts
Liked in: 1662 posts
Joined: Sep 24th, 2006, 10:43 am
Location: Wrong side of the Tracks

PreviousNext

Return to Trials & Tribulations of Traffic

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests