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Adrian Dix (and the NDP) are not what they used to be

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Re: Adrian Dix (and the NDP) are not what they used to be

Postby George+ » Nov 8th, 2012, 10:46 am

Silly.
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Re: Adrian Dix (and the NDP) are not what they used to be

Postby NAB » Dec 1st, 2012, 8:53 am

""When it comes to taxes, even the NDP doesn't want to be the NDP of yore

Dix rejects significant tax increases if his party forms the next government
By Vaughn Palmer, Vancouver Sun December 1, 2012


With the New Democratic Party election platform still a work in progress, Opposition leader Adrian Dix continues to hold the line against proposing any significant tax increases for British Columbians.

"I've said repeatedly that we don't have a lot of tax room," he said Thursday, reacting to an opinion poll released earlier in the day by the left-leaning Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, suggesting broad public support for increasing taxes on corporations and higher-income individuals.

"I don't think there's a lot of room on the income-tax side," he told me during an interview on Voice of B.C. on Shaw TV. "I don't think there's any room for income-tax increases on the middle class."

Other than a possible surcharge on high-income earners, Dix has no intention of reversing any of the multiple reductions in personal income taxes brought in by the B.C. Liberals.

The CCPA release was headlined, "Majority of British Columbians support higher income taxes at $100K," but Dix doesn't share that definition of the "higher income" threshold.

"We are looking at higher levels of income at either the $150,000 or $200,000 level," he said, referring to the surcharge under consideration for the NDP election platform. "We haven't landed on that. I think that will be determined primarily by fiscal issues, because I am concerned that we're going to inherit a very difficult fiscal situation from this government."

But $100,000? "I think it depends on who you are, " he said. "In Metro Vancouver you have people earning what we think of as significantly good salaries - $80,000, $90,000, $100,000 a year - who are paying a huge proportion of their salaries in housing costs, which are very expensive in the city of Vancouver. I think you've got to be careful on these issues."

Moreover, he cautioned, a high-income tax surcharge would not necessarily bring in a lot more money to the provincial treasury. "If you're adding a bracket, it doesn't change the first $150,000 in income. So if you're making $150,001, it effectively has no effect on you - and as you go up in that range, you're not even paying significantly that much more either."

Dix also ruled out any significant changes for consumers with the provincial sales tax, once the harmonized sales tax is phased out next April 1.

"Once we come back to the PST, I don't expect to see significant changes in sales-tax policy over the four years," he said. "We have to work and see what we can do to make the economy more productive. But on the sales-tax side, I think you're going to see a period of stability after four years of, frankly, disruptive instability."

Corporate income taxes were targeted for an increase by the respondents to the CCPA survey. But Dix's intentions on that score would be modest as well. He'd notch the current rate up a point to 12 per cent. But there'd be no going back to the 16.5-per-cent rate that was in place in the last year of NDP government.

"I've been pretty clear on the corporations," he said. "We'd leave in place the tax cuts they got from 2001 to 2008 and roll back the last round of tax cuts to 2008 levels ... It's important for businesses, in some respects, to pay for things." But: "We've got to be competitive; we're an open economy."


In the same interview, Dix also rebuffed a suggestion from the CCPA researcher and policy analyst Ben Parfitt that an increase in stumpage is warranted to help pay for investing in the forest resource and timber inventories.

"I don't think so," Dix said in response to the pitch for higher timber levies. "Right now the industry is in a reasonably vulnerable position still. You see people investing in the industry and we've got forest companies that have had some difficult years that are very good operators, very skilled operators. They're doing OK, but I think this is the wrong time to be doing that right now.

"I agree with Ben that we have to invest in the land base, but that's our job," he said, meaning a job for government.

Note, too, that Dix earlier ruled out a return to the separate tax on corporation capital that the New Democrats brought in during the 1990s and that raised $4 billion over 10 years. Next time, if there is one, he'd impose a minimum tax on bank capital, but no broad-based levy on other corporations.

Putting all this together - no major increases in corporate, sales or personal income taxes, and no increases in timber royalties either - the NDP platform should be modest in terms of proposals to increase taxes and raise government revenues, other than through economic growth.

For all the NDP insistence that things were pretty good in the 1990s, they are not proposing to recreate the tax regime that was in place when they were driven from office in 2001.

The B.C. Liberals, when they considered changing their name earlier this year, were teased about calling themselves "Not the NDP."

But given the efforts of Dix and his colleagues to dissociate themselves from the high-tax resource-rent-extracting policies of the party's past, their slogan might be "We're Not the NDP Either.""
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Re: Adrian Dix (and the NDP) are not what they used to be

Postby steven lloyd » Dec 1st, 2012, 11:25 am

So what does Dix stand for ???

1. No intention of reversing any of the multiple reductions in personal income taxes brought in by the B.C. Liberals.
2. Minor increases in the high-income (over $200,000?) tax surcharge recognizing that would not necessarily bring in a lot more money to the provincial treasury anyway.
3. No significant changes in sales-tax policy over the four years once the PST is brought back in.
4. Modest increases on corporate tax (up one point)
5. Fiscal prudence in spending with an agenda to clean up the mess lleft by ten plus years of reckless fiscal mismanagement.
6. “Putting all this together - no major increases in corporate, sales or personal income taxes, and no increases in timber royalties either - the NDP platform should be modest in terms of proposals to increase taxes and raise government revenues, other than through economic growth.”

Wow – scary stuff :127:


What do the BC Christy Liberals stand for ???

Well, hard to say because it we’ve never seen them be truthful, but $64 million of our tax dollars spent in advertising (apparently not needed anywhere else) is earmarked to feed the sheep their idea. Families (that is, Liberal families) first.
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Re: Adrian Dix (and the NDP) are not what they used to be

Postby Gone_Fishin » Dec 1st, 2012, 12:16 pm

Sure. Yet he's already said he wants to tax the ass off us. If you want to believe a lying forger, go right ahead.

I just don't want to be the one handing you a kleenex to wipe away your tears if he actually gets in and takes a big chunk of your paycheque away. 70¢ will seem like a hell of a deal in comparison.


BC: Adrian Dix Fleshing Out His Tax Plan

Ah, Adrian Dix.

Yesterday, on CKNW’s Bill Good Show, the prospective premier started off singing from the CTF song sheet, attacking the BC Liberal government for nickel and diming BC residents through ICBC increases, Hydro hikes, Ferries fuel surcharges, and Medical Services Premium increases.

We totally agree—the government keeps picking our pockets in a variety of ways.

Then Dix went completely off the rails, laying out an aggressive vision of tax increases—starting with corporations and high income earners. He also backed off on reducing the MSP tax. (The next day on CKNW, political reporters Keith Baldrey and Vaughn Palmer pointed out that to fund the NDP’s commitments, tax increases would have to be extended into the middle class in order to generate the necessary money.)

Almost instantly, the BC Liberals shot out a press release examining what families pay in income taxes in BC:

Let's take a look at tax rates in British Columbia.

In British Columbia, a family earning $90,000 a year paid $5,988 in provincial income tax in 2001. Today the same family pays just $3,166 in provincial income tax – a cut of 47%.

Similarly, a family of four earning $60,000 a year paid $3,272 in provincial income tax in 2001. Today, the same family pays $1,302 in provincial income tax – a 60% tax cut.

The tax cuts brought in by the BC Liberal government have put more money back in the pockets of hard working taxpayers. In fact, British Columbia's personal income taxes are the lowest in the country for individuals earning up to $119,000.

Of course, the press release ignores all of the other increased payments to the government, but you get the point.

Dix did say he felt he was making a historic attempt at transparency by being the first opposition leader he has ever seen to talk about tax increases 18 months before an election. We appreciate that honesty (hidden political agendas are poison for voters), but British Columbians will need to carefully measure all four BC parties’ plans and priorities before casting their ballot in May 2013.


http://taxpayer.com/blog/15-12-2011/bc- ... s-tax-plan
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Re: Adrian Dix (and the NDP) are not what they used to be

Postby maple leaf » Dec 1st, 2012, 12:51 pm

"We are looking at higher levels of income at either the $150,000 or $200,000 level," he said, referring to the surcharge under consideration for the NDP election platform. "We haven't landed on that. I think that will be determined primarily by fiscal issues, because I am concerned that we're going to inherit a very difficult fiscal situation from this government."


Corporate income taxes were targeted for an increase by the respondents to the CCPA survey. But Dix's intentions on that score would be modest as well. He'd notch the current rate up a point to 12 per cent.

Sure doesn't sounds like he is off the rails,with aggressive tax hikes. :coffeecanuck:
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Re: Adrian Dix (and the NDP) are not what they used to be

Postby NAB » Dec 1st, 2012, 1:30 pm

Would that be the same Jordan Bateman who is apparently the BC Director for the Canadian Taxpayer's Federation and occasionally gets his blogs quoted in The Province newspaper FD? (If so, see something more recent than a year ago (now that it is clearer that our economic situation is much much worse than the Liberals were spouting back then in telling us how great things were and what a great job they were doing) at

http://blogs.theprovince.com/2012/11/22 ... h-new-pst/

"Jordan Bateman: Sneaky Libs want to expand taxation with new PST"

Of course the article you refer to doesn't say some of the things the way you choose to interpret it out of context ("..tax the ass off etc"), in fact he agrees with Dix in the second para about the increased cost of things that can only be attributed to the Liberals.

And also, saying Dix "went completely off the rails laying out an aggressive vision of tax increases" is just his opinion (what else would you expect as hyperbole from the CTF?), just as Baldrey and Vaughn's comments in the same paragraph are purely their own opinion... "if" the Liberal hyperbole of those days as to what they SPECULATED an NDP government might do was actually believed by them. But they were just reporting the Liberal line of the times - a lot has changed since then.

That's all old outdated stuff now that our true economic situation has been owned up to by the Liberals, and Clark and de Jong have warned us some tough medicine is going to have to be faced. Of course, they have yet to tell us how they propose to be able to accomplish what they say they want to (stick with their balanced budget 2013/14 commitment), ....but regardless of what they say between now and election day... should they get to form another government they are faced with the same problems (and potential solutions) the NDP would be.... get much more modest with spending, find more revenues (ie more taxes - particularly milk the PST for all it's worth), AND further increase our debt. And they fer sure will hit the middle class harder than the NDP would to do it.

Time to get yerself current FD. The old lies and misleading spin, hyperbole and 70 cent silliness don't wash any more...
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Re: Adrian Dix (and the NDP) are not what they used to be

Postby steven lloyd » Dec 1st, 2012, 1:50 pm

NAB wrote:Would that be the same Jordan Bateman who is apparently the BC Director for the Canadian Taxpayer's Federation and occasionally gets his blogs quoted in The Province newspaper FD? (If so, see something more recent than a year ago (now that it is clearer that our economic situation is much much worse than the Liberals were spouting back then in telling us how great things were and what a great job they were doing) at

http://blogs.theprovince.com/2012/11/22 ... h-new-pst/

"Jordan Bateman: Sneaky Libs want to expand taxation with new PST"

Ancient history and rhetoric, while completing ignoring and denying more recent, greater and even current malfeasance, is all the Liberal apologists have to rely on. I think the absence of credibility in their criticisms is becoming more glaring obvious to more and more of the electorate with every tax dollar spent promoting their agenda of lies. I would have hoped for a better choice than Dix as an alternative to the Liberals, but be that as it may there is nothing more important than removing the current group of entitled, trough-feeding clowns from power. As it is, we are going to be paying off their opportune and auspicious “friends” with our tax dollars for decades to come.
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Re: Adrian Dix (and the NDP) are not what they used to be

Postby sooperphreek » Dec 1st, 2012, 1:56 pm

as long as they are not what the liberals "is" ill be happy
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