Medical marijuana benefits proven?

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Re: Medical marijuana benefits proven?

Postby jimmy4321 » Nov 24th, 2016, 6:14 pm

-Politicians want the tax revenue collected through legalization. The scare tactics make legalization sound like a public safety thing.
-Police don't want legalization. So i believe they either downplay the possbility of fentanal finding its way in marijuana, or if it truly isn't a possibility they will surely let you know.
Just my take on that subject
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Re: Medical marijuana benefits proven?

Postby jimsenchuk » Nov 30th, 2016, 2:28 pm

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Re: Medical marijuana benefits proven?

Postby jimsenchuk » Dec 6th, 2016, 9:49 pm

Is Cannabis the Secret to the Cure for HIV?

The current treatment for HIV, antiretrovirals, suppress the virus, but they only go so far. HIV copies burrow into every reservoir within the body including bone marrow. ARV’s have no effect on HIV copies living inside the brain, leaving patients with HIV-associated cognitive impairment (HAND). The current cocktail includes Efavirenz — a powerfully hallucinogenic drug found in HIV’s most popular pill, Atripla. Isn’t it time for a better solution?

Colorado-based Cannabis Science recently announced its expansion into California. Cannabis Science is teaming up with IGXBio Inc. to combine agonist cannabinoids with advanced DNA immunotherapy. The partnership will focus on creating cannabinoid-based drugs that battle areas where ARV’s fall short.

HIV whittles down the immune system, and ARV’s slow the process dramatically, but cause a panacea of side effects including bone loss, chronic diarrhea and the loss of cognitive function. Martin Shkreli, the personification of pharmaceutical greed, illuminated us all on the cruel and insane pricing for HIV drugs. HIV drugs sell for hundred times more than their actual cost to produce and patients really don’t have a choice.

Cannabis Science’s drugs contain cannabinoids that battle HIV-related Kaposi Sarcoma as well as drug-resistant strains of HIV. Current, normally-effective treatment is useless against drug-resistant HIV. HIV drugs work like antibiotics — if you begin and abandon treatment too early, they becomes usesless. Drug-resistance travels from person-to-person and contracting drug-resistant HIV is a pretty grim sentence. Studies have suggested that the drugs shrink and clear up skin lesions and restore cognitive function.

IGXBio developed an FDA Investigational New Drug (IND) called GenePro, the brand name for its flagship product, Δ4SHIVKU2. GenePro is DNA-based vaccine containing pieces of both simian (ape) immunodeficiency virus (SIV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). GenePro releases proteins through electroporation, which block the replication of HIV. By adding cannabinoids to the mix, Cannabis Science believes they have the key to a breakthrough treatment for HIV.

“To further cement our foothold in the substantial pharmaceutical drug development industry, we expect our IGXBio, GenePro drug development program to be a major pharmaceutical success,” stated Dr. Allen Herman, Cannabis Science’s chief medical officer. “Program specific details are underway and we will update progress and results as they come in.”

Cannabis Science is developing at least three cannabinoid-based drugs, CS-S/BCC-1, CS-TATI-1, and CS-NEURO-1, aimed at battling HAND and other severe side effects. They believe the treatment will help breach the blood-brain barrier and allow the drugs to work inside the brain.

HIV patients desperately need a new treatment plan. Taking ARV’s like Efavirenz can border on unbearable. Efavirenz causes “abnormal dreaming,” by most patients say it causes full-blown hallucinations. The U.S. National Library of Medicine admits that Efavirenz has LSD-like properties. “Anecdotal reports have surfaced concerning misuse of the HIV antiretroviral medication efavirenz by HIV patients and non-infected teens who crush the pills and smoke the powder for its psychoactive effects,” wrote researchers.

If pharmacists can hand out Efavirenz like M&M’s to HIV patients, shouldn’t they be allowed to prescribe medical cannabis?

There is study after study indicating the vast potential that cannabis has for treating HIV. Cannabis reportedly helps with HIV-related neuropathic pain, inflammation and the spread of the virus itself. Research programs use apes like macaques to study HIV. “Our studies have demonstrated that chronic Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) administration results in a generalized attenuation of viral load and tissue inflammation in simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected male rhesus macaques,” wrote researchers.

Even with all the growing evidence to support cannabis’ effectiveness against HIV, some states have dropped the ball. Georgia, who has some of the worst HIV rates in the nation, dropped HIV from its list of qualifying illnesses.

Since the beginning, medical cannabis has been used as a treatment for patients with HIV and we’re just beginning to discover the tip of the iceberg. Cannabinoid-based therapies could help lead the way.

https://cannabisnow.com/cannabis-secret ... ign=buffer
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Re: Medical marijuana benefits proven?

Postby Queen K » Dec 6th, 2016, 11:20 pm

Let's face it, medical cannibis can be grown by the mere peons of this world, don't need multi-billion dollar Big Pharm companies for "marketing" and there can be no tax whatsoever collected by the Government.

So, why indeed.

It's not a mystery to me.
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Re: Medical marijuana benefits proven?

Postby jimsenchuk » Dec 9th, 2016, 3:08 am

Australia Funds Largest MMJ Study in History

Australia is organizing a government-funded clinical trial to explore the effects of medical marijuana on nausea related to chemotherapy. The study is unprecedented in both its size and scope.

“Marijuana may have medical potential, but there’s just not enough research.”

Whenever medical cannabis is discussed, some variation of that statement eventually appears. It’s been repeated so often as to become a mantra — one that conceals the circular logic feeding that lack of research.

There is, of course, a paucity of scientific data about marijuana’s true value as a treatment, in no small part because of the plant’s outlaw status. But there are barriers to studying cannabis because it’s illegal, and it’s illegal because of those barriers.

Someone has to break this vicious cycle, and out of Australia is coming an unlikely volunteer: the government.

The state of New South Wales — home to Sydney, its world-famous opera house and 7.2 million people — is funding what will be the world’s largest-to-date clinical trial involving cannabis as a treatment for nausea in chemotherapy patients.

Nausea and vomiting are common side effects of chemotherapy regimens. This common cancer treatment often plays a role in a patient’s decline if the nausea becomes too extreme for the patient to eat. The famous appetite-stimulating effects of cannabis (colloquially known as “the munchies”) have long been anecdotally tied to offsetting this nausea, but clinical confirmation is still needed.

A total of eighty cancer patients will be selected for the first round of trials. If initial results are positive, a second round will begin. Health officials from the NSW Government, which is putting $21 million (AUS) behind cannabis-related research efforts, said more than 330 people may eventually be enrolled in the study.

Pru Goward, the local minister for medical research in NSW, told the Sydney Morning Herald that this is one of the few instances where a government lamenting lack of research has actually done anything in order to further that research.

“It’s amazing to think that people have been talking about this for 30 years and yet there has been no real investment in putting it up,” Goward said. “It’s come down to NSW to be a world leader.”

The drug to be used in the study comes from North America. According to the Herald’s reporting, patients will be given capsules with “consistent” levels of CBD and THC made by Canada-based Tilray— one of the firms in which Seattle-based equity firm Privateer Holdings is investing.

One of the cancer patients who hopes to be selected to participate in the study is Lauren Hew, a 32-year-old teacher with two children. Hew has Ewing sarcoma, a rare form of bone cancer which she is likely to fight “until it wins.”

She told the Herald that her chemotherapy regimen leaves her vomiting blood so violently it burns her esophagus, and that she experiences dehydration so intense she faints and hits her head.

She hopes that she’s selected and that the treatment works, even if it’s just long enough for her kids to form happy memories of her as “a happy mum who did things with them and took them to the park and to the zoo while I’m here.”

Meanwhile, in America, people facing chronic illness are still waiting for similar studies.

https://cannabisnow.com/australia-funds ... ign=buffer
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Re: Medical marijuana benefits proven?

Postby Silverstarqueen » Dec 13th, 2016, 9:55 am

Canadian draft legislation still in the works:
http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/marijua ... -1.3893876
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Re: Medical marijuana benefits proven?

Postby Fancy » Dec 13th, 2016, 10:04 am

Don't know if anyone has posted this link or not - I haven't looked into it as I've just come across it:
http://www.cmcr.ucsd.edu/index.php/2015 ... blications
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Re: Medical marijuana benefits proven?

Postby jimsenchuk » Dec 16th, 2016, 9:25 pm

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Re: Medical marijuana benefits proven?

Postby jimsenchuk » Dec 16th, 2016, 9:34 pm

Science/Human: Cannabis use in cancer patients halved their risk to die in hospital

Cannabis use was associated with a 59% reduced risk to die in hospital. For cancer patients, the risk to die in a hospital was reduced by 56% among cannabis users compared with non-users. This is the result of an analysis of hospital patients in the US Nationwide Inpatient Sample database between 2007 and 2011, which covers about 1,000 hospitals , by researchers from the University of Northern Colorado, Colorado State University, and the University of Alabama, USA. The database included about 3.9 million hospital patients, of whom 387,608 had a diagnosis of cannabis dependence or cannabis abuse.

In detail, among hospitalized patients, cannabis use was associated with a 60% increased odds of stroke (OR: 1.60, 95% CI: 1.44-1.77) compared with non-users, but a 22% reduced odds of heart failure (OR: 0.78, 95% CI: 0.75-0.82) and 14% reduced odds for cardiac disease (OR: 0.86, 95% CI: 0.82-0.91). The risk for in-hospital mortality was reduced by 59% (OR: 0.41, 95% CI: 0.38-0.44). Among cancer patients, odds of in-hospital mortality was significantly reduced by 56% among cannabis users compared with non-users (OR: 0.44, 95% CI: 0.35-0.55). Authors wrote that “prospective studies will be needed to better characterize the health effects of marijuana use, especially among older, sicker, and/or hospitalized patients.” Thus, there is the possibility that cannabis users more often do not die in hospitals, but at home.

http://www.cannabis-med.org/english/bul ... p?id=494#1
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Re: Medical marijuana benefits proven?

Postby jimsenchuk » Dec 19th, 2016, 10:39 pm

Study Finds Lifelong Pot Users Are Healthy.

Long-term marijuana use does not seem to lead to a decline in overall physical health, though decades of smoking the sweet leaf could contribute to periodontal disease, a significant new study finds.

In a study of nearly 1,000 New Zealanders tracked over 40 years, people reporting nearly 20 years of consistent pot smoking did not show any signs of a decline in lung function, high blood pressure, diabetes, or any other deterioration of physical health.

In fact, the only negative consequence researchers say was present in heavy cannabis smokers as opposed to non-smokers was more gum disease.

“We can see the physical health effects of tobacco smoking in this study, but we don’t see similar effects for cannabis smoking,” said lead study author Madeline Meier, assistant professor of psychology at Arizona State University.

This means while choosing to smoke marijuana as a preferred method of consumption may bring about some oral health problems over an extended period of time (researchers noticed this happening to people between the ages of 26 and 38) there is no evidence to suggest that smoking weed on a regular basis, even if that means decades of daily use, has the potential to sabotage one’s health in a similar manner to that of long-term use of tobacco.

“What we’re seeing is that cannabis may be harmful in some respects, but possibly not in every way,” says study co-author Avshalom Caspi, professor of psychology and neuroscience at Duke University. “We need to recognize that heavy recreational cannabis use does have some adverse consequences, but overall damage to physical health is not apparent in this study.”

Interestingly, in countries that have legalized cannabis for medical purposes, some insurance companies have already begun to separate those who use marijuana from the same rank as their tobacco toking counterparts – classifying patients who smoke weed for therapeutic purposes as “non-smokers” – because research has shown marijuana and tobacco, while typically consumed through the same process, are actually very different when it comes to their individual effects on human health.

In a move that is being praised by medical marijuana patients all across Canada, BMO and Sun Life recently announced that they would no longer require cannabis users to select the “smokers” box on their respective life insurance questionnaires – a move that could save many of those participating in the northern nation’s medical marijuana program up to 50 percent on their insurance premiums.

“In our industry, we keep up to date with medical studies and companies update their underwriting guidelines accordingly,” Sun Life said in a statement. “As a result, people who use marijuana are now assessed … at non-smoker rates, unless they also use tobacco.”

Insurance experts say the insurers’ decision to no longer classify marijuana users as smokers is a sharp signal from the bowels of the corporate world that marijuana is, without a doubt, safer than tobacco. Otherwise, neither company would have dared take such a bold leap. After all, they are in the business of expanding the bottom line, not to make moral judgments or take any sort of political stance that could jeopardize the financial standings of shareholders.

“What this tells me is that they have done their research, examined the evidence and concluded that the patterns of risk associated with typical marijuana use is much lower than that of typical tobacco use,” Paul Groontendorst, rector of the division of social and administrative pharmacy in the Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy at the University of Toronto told reporters.

At the core of the entire debate surrounding whether marijuana is as dangerous as tobacco is a disease that is expected to kill around 595,690 people in the United States this year – cancer.

Last week, researchers at the University of Western Australia published an outlandish paper in the journal of Mutation Research that suggested people who smoke weed were altering their DNA in such a way that could cause their children to have cancer in the early years of their life. The study, overseen by Associate Professor Stuart Reece and Professor Gary Hulse from UWA’s School of Psychiatry and Clinical Sciences, said “Even if a mother has never used cannabis in her life, the mutations passed on by a father’s sperm can cause serious and fatal illnesses in their children.”

Come to find out, the researchers in the study never conducted any tests to arrive at this shocking conclusion – the entire basis for the research was a review of other studies. Cannabinoids experts quickly came out in opposition of the two scientist’s findings, arguing that their report was “based on a foundation of falsehoods.” Although previous research has concluded that other drugs, including tobacco and alcohol, have the potential to damage DNA, Dr. Ethan Russo, former Senior Medical Advisor for GW Pharmaceuticals said the smoking-weed-will-give-your-kids-cancer study is missing so many critical variables that it would be irresponsible to entertain their report as anything other than modern day reefer madness.

So, while there may be evidence smoking marijuana for decades is hard on your gums, it appears that even the habitual user can sleep soundly tonight knowing their longtime love affair with the herb is not likely to chisel their or anybody else’s tombstone.

https://cannabisnow.com/study-lifelong- ... ign=buffer
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Re: Medical marijuana benefits proven?

Postby jimsenchuk » Dec 19th, 2016, 10:45 pm

Mile High Massage Highlights the Healing Power of Topicals

Cannabis medicine is often associated with smoking, vaping or oral ingestion of edibles or tinctures. But medical marijuana also encompasses the healing potential of topically applied cannabinoids. Cannabis Now’s Senior Editor, Ellen Holland, shares her experience getting a cannabis-infused massage.

A soft, fresh snow is falling on the city. I’m holed up in my Airbnb in the RiNo district, an exuberant young art community that has sprung up in Denver only in the last few years.

It’s not yet 9 a.m., but I’m smoking two healthy bowls of Banana Kush on the balcony to get in the proper state for the unique massage treatment I’ve planned. I’ve also swallowed a 10 milligram capsule of solventless hash crafted by extract artist Nikka T.

Donning both a thick sweater and heavy coat, I walk a few blocks through the snow, observing the contrast of white upon colorful swaths of graffiti art installed as part of an annual street art event called The Crush.

I was born and raised in California, so when I step into LoDo Massage Studio for my “mile high” treatment, I’m wearing black leather tennis shoes now partially coated with damp snow.

Receptionist and yoga instructor Shawnee Lowe doesn’t seem to notice.

“Feel free to take your boots off,” she says, and offers me a glass of water.

The studio is a homey, no frills space primarily reflecting the purple accents of the business’ branding. As a visitor I’m partially out of place: California just legalized the adult-use of cannabis through Proposition 64 in November, but still has a steps to make towards the normalization of cannabis use. Colorado, a state that legalized adult-use in 2012, is years ahead.

Business owner Ed Rich explains that a massage that includes a cream infused with cannabis, whether it be with THC or CBD, is a great way to explore the medical applications of marijuana.

“[Colorado] legalized it for all these other reasons and this is one of them,” he says. “I feel like it’s great to be in that area where it’s being utilized for something that’s definitely needed without the stigma associated with it.”

My massage begins in a typical fashion, but I soon feel the coolness of the CBD-infused Apothecanna cream. The combination of the cream and the deep tissue massage I receive from my masseuse, 29-year-old Sarah Flack, feels like its penetrating my skin on a deeper level.

Throughout the hour-long experience soothing music plays as Flack uses her integrative style of sports massage combined with a bit of Thai massage, coupled with the cream to send my body into a deep state of relaxation.

“It’s really cool working with that lotion, for sure,” she says after the treatment is complete. “It’s really nice for me too, my hands don’t really hurt like I used to before.”

Cannabis topicals work by interacting with the endocannabinoid system receptors that appear all throughout the body, including our skin. When using topicals, one does not get the psychoactive “high” typically associated with marijuana use, but can still receive healing benefits such as a reduction in inflammation and pain.

When I ask Flask if people ever show up for their massage treatments super stoned she laughs and confirms that, yes, sometimes her clients do show up to the studio pre-baked.

“I don’t really see a problem with it, I really enjoy getting a massage stoned myself,” she says. “I feel like I can really let go and receive the healing work a lot better. I think cannabis is amazing in that way.”

Her co-worker confirms that customers often ask about what exactly a “mile high” massage might entail.

“People usually want to know, ‘So first thing’s first, you have the Apothecanna cream, am I going to get really high or do I need to smoke before I come in?’” Lowe says. “I think it’s very rare that someone comes in and doesn’t want the Apothecanna cream. We’re signed up with 420 Tours in Denver so we get a lot of people coming in from out of town because of that.”

As a first point of contact for the studio, Lowe often finds her self explaining the benefits of cannabis topicals to curious would-be customers.

“I get to educate them a little bit,” she says. “Which is nice because I feel like they get to go home to whatever state it is that they’re from and they can educate their friends and family and just kind of get the word out that marijuana’s not a bad thing.”

Rich tells me although he initially thought there might be pushback from his older customers when his business — which began as a chair massage copy that now includes over 700 corporate clients and two massage studios in Denver — decided to embrace cannabis massage.

“I’ve found no pushback whatsoever, everybody embraces it because this is one of the reasons why they legalized it, to be utilized in an environment like this, where it’s truly medically beneficial,” he says. “I would love to bring it into our corporate chair massage business but I am concerned about the pushback on a corporate level.”

In addition to the normality surrounding the cannabis-infused massage at the business, the employees also seem to embrace erasing the stigma in admitting their own cannabis use.

When her clients ask her if they can smoke, Flack always tells them the same thing.

“Don’t smoke it in here. Do what you do just don’t tell me about it, I’m not going to judge. I like to do it too,” she says. “I think that there is a way to be responsible with [cannabis] and there’s a way to be irresponsible with it and I think that because it’s been legalized it makes it easier to be responsible with it. I’m not going to come completely stoned to work just because, I mean, I do a lot of deep tissue and neuromuscular and I need to be focused on what I’m doing.”

To complete my experience Rich tells me I should make the journey to the Apothecanna headquarters, which is about two blocks away. He assures me someone will answer if I knock on the door hard enough and his assumption is correct.

When I arrive at the headquarters, a bright industrial studio that fits in perfectly with the hip vibe of the neighborhood, I’m warmly greeted by the employees.

Office manager, Jazmin Dukes, says the headquarters is where the company makes its over-the-counter products and puts together kits for cannabis companies it has partnered with. In this regard, Apothecanna is a not a marijuana company, per se, but rather a traditional beauty company that partners with businesses in the cannabis space to sell THC-infused products.

While the CBD cream from Apothecanna is sourced from hemp, the THC creams are sourced from marijuana. Founded in 2009, the company is based on the healing properties of plants, including cannabis.

“We’re sending [the kits] out to our licensed partners who then source their own THC oil and then infuse it with our products and then sell it in a dispensary,” she says. “We’re definitely geared towards being a part of everyone’s health and beauty routine, being part of a lifestyle of caring for yourself in health and wellness in that aspect.”

The whole experience of the “mile high” massage has been rejuvenating. Self care incorporating cannabis and massage is a great way to stay healthy by exploring the full potential of this amazing plant.

https://cannabisnow.com/mile-high-massa ... -topicals/
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Re: Medical marijuana benefits proven?

Postby jimsenchuk » Dec 23rd, 2016, 9:22 am

Study Shows Cannabis Does Not Cause Schizophrenia

Especially among prohibitionists, schizophrenia has long been raised as a potential risk of cannabis use. But new research refutes this implied causal relationship and clarifies the relationship between marijuana and mental illness, showing that schizophrenia may lead to cannabis use — not the other way around.

New research out of the University of Bristol shed a bit more light on the well documented observational associations between cannabis use and those who suffer from schizophrenia. The research notes that the link between cannabis and schizophrenia is poorly understood and that figuring out the root cause for this link has proven a major challenge.

Schizophrenia is a lifelong mental disorder involving a breakdown in the relation between thought, emotion, and behavior. This leads to faulty perception, inappropriate actions and feelings, a withdrawal from reality and personal relationships into fantasy and delusion and a sense of mental fragmentation. While schizophrenia is not curable, it can be treated.

Dr. Suzi Gage, one of the researchers at Bristol’s School of Experimental Psychology told Science Daily that the data seems to suggest that schizophrenia can lead to cannabis use, not vice a versa:

“Our results use a novel method to attempt to untangle the association between cannabis and schizophrenia. While we find stronger evidence that schizophrenia risk predicts cannabis use, rather than the other way round, it doesn’t rule out a causal risk of cannabis use on schizophrenia,” Dr. Gage said. “What will be interesting is digging deeper into the potential sub-populations of cannabis users who may be at greater risk, and getting a better handle on the impact of heavy cannabis use.”

Gage went on to note the researchers could only look at cannabis initiation, basically, whether anyone had ever tried cannabis ever or had not. She said more detailed information about use patterns would help the research.

“What would really help progress this research is to use genetic variants that predict heaviness of cannabis use, as it seems that heavy cannabis use is most strongly associated with risk of schizophrenia,” she said. “Once genetic variants are identified that predict heaviness of cannabis use we’ll be able to do this.”

Cannabis advocacy organizations have been battling back against the links between its use and mental health issues affecting certain users.

Among them, Paul Armentano, Deputy Director at the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws, who said this new data further solidifies the need for sane, humane drug policy.

“We argue that such health risk concerns call for regulation, not criminal prohibition,” he said. “So that cannabis’ use among more potentially vulnerable populations such as adolescents may be better discouraged through education and reduced access.”

Armentano has extensively covered the issue for NORML. In his 2007 report Cannabis, Mental Health, and Context: The Case For Regulation, he noted one issue with the current batch of research was where the data relied on participants using the pill Marinol. The all THC pill lacks the CBD, and its anxiolytic and antipsychotic effects.

“Separate studies have largely dismissed the theory that cannabis exposure may play a causal role in these illnesses, finding that rates of psychiatric disorders like schizophrenia have remained static even as cannabis exposure has significantly increased,” Armentano said.

He closed on the most recent batch of research.

“A most recent literature review instead hypothesizes that that cannabis use does not cause the psychosis, but rather, that subjects susceptible to the disorder are more likely to engage in the early-onset use of the substance,” he said. “Evidence reviewed here suggests that cannabis does not in itself cause a psychosis disorder… rather, the evidence leads us to conclude that both early use and heavy use of cannabis are more likely in individuals with a vulnerability to psychosis.”

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Re: Medical marijuana benefits proven?

Postby jimsenchuk » Dec 23rd, 2016, 9:53 am

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Re: Medical marijuana benefits proven?

Postby jimsenchuk » Dec 27th, 2016, 1:08 am

Teen pot use declines in Colorado after legalization, study says.



Teen marijuana use fell sharply in Colorado in the years 2014 and 2015, after the opening of that state’s recreational marijuana market, new federal survey data show.

The state-level data from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health showed that 18.35 percent of Coloradans ages 12 to 17 had used marijuana in the past year in 2014 or 2015, down sharply from 20.81 percent in 2013/2014. (In this survey, years are paired for state-level data to provide larger sample sizes). That works out to about a 12 percent drop in marijuana use, year-over-year.

Year-over-year teen marijuana use fell in most states during that time period, including in Washington, the other state to open recreational marijuana markets in 2014. But that drop wasn’t statistically significant.

Conversely, adult marijuana use rose significantly in Colorado over the same time period. Among Coloradans ages 26 and older, past-year marijuana use rose from 16.80 percent in 2013/2014 to 19.91 percent in 2014/2015. Annual adult marijuana use was up in most states during the same time frame. The legal marijuana markets in Colorado, Washington and elsewhere feature strict age and purchasing limits.

This federal data released this week is the first clear evidence of a drop in teen marijuana use in Colorado after legalization.

Legalization supporters have long argued that the best way to prevent underage marijuana use is to legalize and regulate the drug.

Marijuana use is generally a riskier endeavor for adolescents and young adults, whose brains are still developing. Studies show people who start using marijuana in their teens are at a greater risk than adults of becoming dependent on the drug or suffering from mental health issues related to it.

The federal data doesn’t speak to what, exactly, is behind the decrease in teen marijuana use in Colorado. Broadly speaking, adolescent substance use has declined across the board in recent years.

In Colorado, the drop in teen marijuana use could reflect changes related to legalization, such as a diminution of the black market. Or it could be a reflection of broader cultural trends, such as increasing disapproval of teen drug use or better substance abuse prevention programs for kids. It’s likely that a number of factors are at play.

Some experts had expected more permissive attitudes toward pot to lead to increased teen use and have subsequently been surprised to find that teen marijuana use has held steady or even fallen nationwide over the past few years.

The federal survey data do show that the overall rate of teen marijuana use remains higher in Colorado than it is in any other state. But that trend began well before legalization, as the chart below of monthly marijuana use in Colorado and the United States shows.

Other data sources, including the Colorado Department of Health’s own numbers, show that Colorado is essentially middle-of-the-pack among the states on adolescent marijuana use.

In either case, the overall trend – flat or falling teen use – appears to support legalization supporters’ arguments that liberalizing marijuana policies will not pose a serious public health threat to adolescents.

https://durangoherald.com/articles/1237 ... study-says
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Re: Medical marijuana benefits proven?

Postby jimsenchuk » Dec 27th, 2016, 2:30 am

Research Proving Cannabis Kills Cancer Cells Safely has been Suppressed Since 1974

http://www.healthy-holistic-living.com/ ... ml?t=SNTHS
The only effective answer to organized greed is organized labor.
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