Shoreline Eco-systems

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Queen K
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Re: Shoreline Eco-systems

Post by Queen K »

You did but I still needed the sandbag article to be in here too.
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Fancy
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Re: Shoreline Eco-systems

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Absolutely - too many sandbags are contaminated with septic field water - don't want that on the beaches.
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Queen K
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Re: Shoreline Eco-systems

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https://www.castanet.net/edition/news-s ... htm#199893

The Regional District of Okanagan Similkameen is asking private property owners to hold off on tearing down sandbag walls, because the provincial government is footing the bill.

More than 500,000 sandbags have been distributed throughout the region, and residents are asked to not empty sandbags along the banks or foreshore of any creeks, rivers or lakes. Instead, the RDOS says the province will be paying local governments to remove full sandbags.

“We are incredibly grateful to the province for covering the costs incurred by local governments for the removal of sandbags from private properties,” said Karla Kozakevich, RDOS chair, in a news release.

“Residents should keep sandbags in place for now. Local governments will be organizing clean up teams to remove sandbags in the near future. Residents will be advised once the programs are developed as to the potential steps and timelines.”

Sand dumped in or along waterways can have serious impacts on the local ecosystem, many which are habitat for endangered or rare species.

Residents can use the soil on their property well away from creeks and lake, but if the sandbags have come into contact with bacteria, chemicals or oils, getting the sand and sandbags off your property is advised.
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Rwede
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Re: Shoreline Eco-systems

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We should remember that Glacial Lake Penticton, the predecessor water body to Lake Okanagan, was 300 metres higher than Lake Okanagan is today. That was about 10,000 years ago. We're freaked by a metre of water today.

The ecosystems should be fine with the extra water. This year, they are more naturally inundated than the man-controlled lake levels we're used to. Flooding actually helps ecosystems - just look at the historical oxbows in Mission Creek that used to get supplied with water every year at freshet, which we've now starved for water with diking and flood control. Those oxbows are teaming with aquatic life when they get water.

The only problems I can see this year is the man made crap along the shorelines that has been disturbed and tossed about in littoral areas that are so critical to invertebrates and fish. There's also the likelihood that calls will be made to lower the lake next year to avoid floods, which will starve littoral areas, drain shore spawning areas, and discharge more water in Okanagan River during critical salmon egg incubation and alevin periods.

The flooding isn't a problem for the ecosystems. Our attempts to influence/control it is a problem for the ecosystems.
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Queen K
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Re: Shoreline Eco-systems

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Great post, I had no time to respond earlier, but here goes, I'm now looking up "littoral areas" to get the exact definition down and will be checking the dates on when exactly we were at the Evely Campsite and photographing spawning activity on the shoreline. I wish to return to that spot on the exact or approx. date to check for activity or water level.

I know one poster here who has photographed the barge activity picking up free floating docks, so there has been some efforts towards reducing damages. Someone's dock is resting at Rotary Beach behind the gabions, it's full of nails, I wish the authorities would remove it before the nails drop out into the sands. We were so close to them standing on the shoreline I believe I know exactly what you mean by starving them out, who's to say the shoreline lower down is ideal for spawning? Maybe not.

The freaking part comes when one realizes the millions of dollars of real damage to human made structures all over the Okanagan with all lakes involved.

What is the solution at this point?
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Terris
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Re: Shoreline Eco-systems

Post by Terris »

Queen K wrote:The freaking part comes when one realizes the millions of dollars of real damage to human made structures all over the Okanagan with all lakes involved.

What is the solution at this point?


I know, I know. Pick me. Pick me...

Too easy...

We need to collectively consider the impacts of our ramped up lifestyles on the environment, which we need more than it needs us, collectively smarten up, and live harmoniously with Mother Nature. :biggrin:

What is the true value of these million$ in human fabrications considering that Mother Nature can reduce these Ozymandian
edifices to rubble at her will.

Serenity now...
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Queen K
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Re: Shoreline Eco-systems

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Rwede wrote:We should remember that Glacial Lake Penticton, the predecessor water body to Lake Okanagan, was 300 metres higher than Lake Okanagan is today. That was about 10,000 years ago. We're freaked by a metre of water today.

The ecosystems should be fine with the extra water. This year, they are more naturally inundated than the man-controlled lake levels we're used to. Flooding actually helps ecosystems - just look at the historical oxbows in Mission Creek that used to get supplied with water every year at freshet, which we've now starved for water with diking and flood control. Those oxbows are teaming with aquatic life when they get water.

The only problems I can see this year is the man made crap along the shorelines that has been disturbed and tossed about in littoral areas that are so critical to invertebrates and fish. There's also the likelihood that calls will be made to lower the lake next year to avoid floods, which will starve littoral areas, drain shore spawning areas, and discharge more water in Okanagan River during critical salmon egg incubation and alevin periods.

The flooding isn't a problem for the ecosystems. Our attempts to influence/control it is a problem for the ecosystems.


Rwede, you were saying in another thread that the lake is in fact "'too clean". Looks like that is not an issue anymore.

https://www.castanet.net/edition/news-s ... htm#200354

The Okanagan Indian Band says an assessment of Okanagan Lake water in the northern arm has found a combination of high organic material including sewage output, grass leaves, burlap, sand and dead animals combined with the high temperatures of the past few days have resulted in an algae bloom.

The OKIB's emergency operations centre will be monitoring the bloom but residents are advised it will be a common site over the coming days.

Residents and visitors are advised not to go into the water, drink or have contact with the water.

Approximately 200 residences on OKIB land, both seasonal and permanent, remain on evacuation order due to flooding.

ORIGINAL STORY 2:16 p.m.

The Okanagan Indian Band has issued a warning after a raw sewage discharge into the northern end of Okanagan Lake.

"The event has been reported to the Ministry of Environment and is currently under investigation," said an OKIB release on its Facebook page.

The OKIB's emergency operations centre (EOC) has asked residents and visitors "to refrain from entering into the northern arm of Okanagan Lake until further notice."

People have also been warned not to drink the water.

"Sewage water pollution is dangerous, disgusting and filthy dirty. It can be filled with potentially life-threatening hazards," said the release.

The band said Sunday that the lake level is down .4 mm to 343.140 metres.

When the flooding began weeks ago, band chief Byron Louis had expressed concern about waters invading septic fields.

Neighbourhoods on band land have been hit hard by the flooding
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LTD
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Re: Shoreline Eco-systems

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calling that an algae bloom now just more polite wording for pooooop
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Queen K
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Re: Shoreline Eco-systems

Post by Queen K »

Rwede did say the lake was in fact too clean and needed more organic matter.

I do not make this up. I'd like to bring his quote in here but I know there are rules about that. Rules. ya.
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Fancy
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Re: Shoreline Eco-systems

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Should be able to point to the thread:
viewtopic.php?f=23&t=72855
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Queen K
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Re: Shoreline Eco-systems

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That's it!

I know I can't bring the whole debate over here, but yes, it also fits here. :130:
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Rwede
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Re: Shoreline Eco-systems

Post by Rwede »

Queen K wrote:Rwede did say the lake was in fact too clean and needed more organic matter.

I do not make this up. I'd like to bring his quote in here but I know there are rules about that. Rules. ya.



It does need more nutrients to raise fish productivity. That's fact.

However, not at the risk of anoxia, wherein the ultimate death of the resultant algal bloom is so concentrated that it robs the system of oxygen, which is deadly for fish.

Nutrient loading is good, but not to the point of excessive algal bloom. And nutrient loading isn't the same as uncontrolled dumps of organic matter.
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Queen K
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Re: Shoreline Eco-systems

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As sand bags were being removed at what looked like record pace yesterday in time for the long weekend, I noticed tiny fish in the shoreline pools at Rotary Beach.

Also, at Rotary Marsh, the beavers have wreaked havoc on trees and completely changed the landscape across from the viewing platforms. Looks like the Thistles I originally cited as a concern are dying out at the roots, there may not be a good food source there this year afterall as I thought.
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Re: Shoreline Eco-systems

Post by f/22 »

Since this seems to be the 'hot thread' now . . ..

If it helps anyone, this was in my e-mail yesterday from Cord Emergency.



Online Property Owners Flood Damage Assessment Tool

https://embc-maps.lightship.works/#/map ... znP_FUTweQ

Since early May, the Central Okanagan has been impacted by historic lake water levels and associated flooding. This includes damage to public and private properties.

Today, crews are continuing to remove some flood defenses and cleaning up debris on those public beach and road ends that are at a higher elevation and unlikely to sustain any wave damaging erosion. They’re expected to finish this stage of work in Peachland and West Kelowna and complete activities along some City of Kelowna areas in City Park, Tugboat Bay and Sutherland Bay.

As well, contracted crews are working on debris removal from the lake and along public areas from Rotary Beach north toward the W.R. Bennett Bridge.

Today, the Emergency Operations Centre, in cooperation with Emergency Management BC, launched a digital tool that allows individual residents to report damage to their properties and how the flooding has affected them.

By collecting information about properties that sustained flood damage, the recovery team will better understand the magnitude of flooding and it will assist in preventing future flooding. Officials will also be able to understand how flooding has impacted the community and be able to connect residents with helpful resources.

Among those available, the BC Disaster Financial Assistance program and a program offered by the Canadian Red Cross. Information on the Provincial program is available online at http://www2.gov.bc.ca/gov/content/safet ... assistance while potential assistance from the Red Cross can be accessed at http://www.redcross.ca/how-we-help/curr ... oods-2017-–-red-cross-support

Since yesterday, Okanagan Lake is down 1.5 centimetres from yesterday and sits at 343.052 metres above sea level. That’s still 57 centimetres above full pool. Kalamalka Lake dropped 1.4 centimetres from yesterday and is now at 392.243 metres, which is just over 53 centimetres above full pool.

Property owners along lakefront should continue to monitor their flood protection measures. For residents in areas were the flooding risk has passed, more information about sandbag locations for drop off, details about recovery efforts, and a link to the online Emergency Management BC sandbag recovery application, can be found at http://www.cordemergency.ca/beprepared/flood-recovery.

Those residents and visitors who may wish to head out onto area lakes are encouraged follow the guidelines for respectful boating. They’re encouraged to view the Boating Wake maps at http://www.cordemergency.ca/map in order to protect against wave generated shoreline erosion. Once lake levels reach more reasonable levels, regular boating activities can resume.


Sandbag app
https://embc-maps.lightship.works/#/map ... Xeml65m93w
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Queen K
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Re: Shoreline Eco-systems

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https://www.castanet.net/edition/news-s ... htm#201222

And we think we dump stuff in the lake. I wonder how many people are secretly just depositing the sand in the lake.

And then here comes Mother Nature saying "hold my beer." How many thousands of pounds of clay just got deposited in the lake?

If I were one of the many homeowners with a lake view on top of these these clay bluffs, I'd be letting this slide give pause for thought. I'm sure Insurance agencies are on to this too.

But look at the shoreline now!
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