Eastern Grey Squirrel, the new terror.

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DaveC
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Re: Eastern Grey Squirrel, the new terror.

Post by DaveC »

janalta wrote:You don't find statements like these a little hysterical?



Maybe a little exaggerated, but I read them more as statements of fact, not fear. I don't see the poster proposing any outrageous action or irrational opinions. From our perspective before anything bad has happened in our backyards it may seem exaggerated. We'll know in time I expect. I have seen them attack red squirrels and birds nests, and I have had to deal with the buggers living in attics, so it doesnt' seem like much of an exaggeration to me.

I personally clearly recall reading an article in Macleans magazine back in 2000, about how "hysterical" people were getting over a little outbreak of mountain pine beetle. "No need to be hysterical. It's part of the natural cycle" said the provincial forester, "It will come to a natural end in a year or two. The forests will be fine".

Hmmmmmmmmmmmmm..........
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Bestside
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Re: Eastern Grey Squirrel, the new terror.

Post by Bestside »

DaveC wrote:I personally clearly recall reading an article in Macleans magazine back in 2000, about how "hysterical" people were getting over a little outbreak of mountain pine beetle. "No need to be hysterical. It's part of the natural cycle" said the provincial forester, "It will come to a natural end in a year or two. The forests will be fine".

Hmmmmmmmmmmmmm..........

Hmmm you think those bark eating gray squirrels were introduced here to see if they find that the pine beetles are a delicacy?
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Type_O
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Re: Eastern Grey Squirrel, the new terror.

Post by Type_O »

Ken7 wrote:I think we have all given squirrels peanuts.

However, where would you purchase raw peanuts?? Cooking supplies possibly, most peanuts are roasted in the shell or seasoned. I don't believe we would eat them raw....

I know the squirrels loved the salt of the seasoned and they usually ate half the shelled peanut and then horded the rest of them.

Not sure how true it is, although my father said squirrels have poor memory. That is why the stash everywhere, then in winter months they might stumble across a stash of pine cones or peanuts.


You can buy unroasted (raw) peanuts at WalMrt - Save M - coppers, bulk foods, pretty much anywhere. Shelled or not.
DaveC
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Re: Eastern Grey Squirrel, the new terror.

Post by DaveC »

DaveC wrote:I personally clearly recall reading an article in Macleans magazine back in 2000, about how "hysterical" people were getting over a little outbreak of mountain pine beetle. "No need to be hysterical. It's part of the natural cycle" said the provincial forester, "It will come to a natural end in a year or two. The forests will be fine".

Hmmmmmmmmmmmmm..........



Bestside wrote:Hmmm you think those bark eating gray squirrels were introduced here to see if they find that the pine beetles are a delicacy?



What could go wrong? :spinball:
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econovan64
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Re: Eastern Grey Squirrel, the new terror.

Post by econovan64 »

They love raw sunflower seeds and will eat right out of your hand given time. People have them come and go from open windows in the house as tame as any pet. The black ones look very beautiful bounding across the lawn in summer. If they get into the attic its because you have let the soffit or fascia get rotten. I've been seeing more of them around this past year. Very nice to see.
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Queen K
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Re: Eastern Grey Squirrel, the new terror.

Post by Queen K »

What would be the natural predators of these squirrels? Racoons? Birds of prey? Us? What else?
As WW3 develops, no one is going to be dissing the "preppers." What have you done?
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Re: Eastern Grey Squirrel, the new terror.

Post by Tenlock »

hawks and owls
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Queen K
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Re: Eastern Grey Squirrel, the new terror.

Post by Queen K »

So a food source has been added to the menu for birds of prey. Good, let's hope the checks and balances of nature takes care of itself.
As WW3 develops, no one is going to be dissing the "preppers." What have you done?
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econovan64
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Re: Eastern Grey Squirrel, the new terror.

Post by econovan64 »

As far as squirrels go I have never seen many of the indigenous red squirrels in the local area. Very few compared to many other places such as Alberta where they are simply everywhere in the woods. Walking along the Greenway etc you only see the odd one. I really doubt the Eastern Grey will have a big impact as they can't survive in the local bush.

Its the same with racoons, the local population is small compared to some eastern cities where they can be seen in very large numbers. Could be the hot dry summers keep reproduction low.

Here is what the BCSPCA says about the Eastern Grey Squirrel
The most common squirrel in urban B.C., the Eastern Grey Squirrel, is actually an import from eastern Canada which was released into Stanley Park in 1909.
They were then introduced to Vancouver Island in 1966. Eastern Grey Squirrels are much larger than native squirrels, are either grey or black in colour, and flourish in urban environments.
The increasing number of Eastern Grey Squirrels is often blamed for the decrease in native squirrel populations, however given that these squirrels have different food and shelter preferences, its more likely that urban development and the loss of coniferous forests is responsible.
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kina
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Re: Eastern Grey Squirrel, the new terror.

Post by kina »

econovan64 wrote:Here is what the BCSPCA says about the Eastern Grey Squirrel
...The increasing number of Eastern Grey Squirrels is often blamed for the decrease in native squirrel populations, however given that these squirrels have different food and shelter preferences, its more likely that urban development and the loss of coniferous forests is responsible.


Thanks for that econovan64. Gives some better insight to the "situation".
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kina
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Re: Eastern Grey Squirrel, the new terror.

Post by kina »

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8sOw3mCz4Oc


Looks to me like they have more heart than we do sometimes...
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Rwede
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Re: Eastern Grey Squirrel, the new terror.

Post by Rwede »

grammafreddy wrote:Is that like a packrat?

packrat.jpg


Don't panic - this one is dead. But I'll take squirrels over packrats ANY day!


I've had to deal with many of those stinkers at the cottage Grams. The smell is just a bit more sour than a tom cat's spray.

Packrats (aka Bushy-tailed Woodrats) are not much different from Greys, except the Greys are "cuter." The biggest difference is that packrats are indingenous species, whereas Greys are introduced alien species that will damage our existing ecosystems.

It's the same effect as putting pike into a rainbow trout lake - the pike will take over and alter the ecosystem considerably, often extirpating native organisms. Greys are well-known for causing similar problems.
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Rwede
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Re: Eastern Grey Squirrel, the new terror.

Post by Rwede »

Ken7 wrote:I'll take squirrels of any colour before roof rats or neweigion rats. Squirrels do help in re-forestation. They are great to watch although they will camp in you attic if you let them.

Other then that they don't bother me none!

Hope none of you are having trouble sleeping over this one! :dyinglaughing:



The Greys do just the opposite.

"Gray squirrels cause economic damage to forests by removing bark from trees,
particularly broadleafed types such as oak and beech, and have the potential to suppress natural forest
regeneration."

http://a100.gov.bc.ca/pub/eirs/finishDo ... entId=2494


"IMPACTS ON THE GARRY OAK ECOSYSTEM

As discussed above, gray squirrels are hardwood-specialists
and are likely to do best in hardwood and mixed woodland
types on Vancouver Island. The endangered Garry oak
ecosystems are, therefore, prime candidates for habitats
where gray squirrels may replace North American red squirrels
and reach higher densities than those of the red squirrel
populations they have replaced.

In British Columbia, the Garry oak ecosystem is restricted
mainly to the southeast coast of Vancouver Island and the
southern Gulf Islands. Urban development and the encroachment
of another alien species, Scotch broom (Cytisus
scoparius), have been important causes of ecosystem loss in
the past (Erickson 1993). The Garry oak ecosystem has been
placed on the provincial Red List in view of its threatened
status within the province, and it has become one of the
rarest habitat types in Canada. The Garry oak is the only oak
native to British Columbia. On Vancouver Island, Garry oak
ecosystems have existed without the presence of the hardwood-
specialist gray squirrel. There are several possible
repercussions of the establishment of gray squirrel populations
in Garry oak stands:

Prevention of natural regeneration

High densities of gray squirrels in hardwood forests could
prevent natural regeneration (e.g., Shaw 1968, Gill et al.
1995). Even though gray squirrels scatterhoard seeds during
autumn and are sometimes cited as agents for seed dispersal
(e.g., Mellanby 1968), they cut out the radicle of acorns from
the white oak group (which includes Garry oak) soon after
they fall to the ground, thus preventing their germination
(Fox 1982, Pigott et al. 1991). “Notched” acorns have been
observed in Garry oak ecosystems on Vancouver Island (M.
Fuchs, Foxtree Ecological Consulting, 1997, pers. comm.).
Further evidence comes from England, where gray squirrels
have been known to completely destroy germinating acorns
(Pigott et al. 1991). In many urban parks and gardens in the
United Kingdom (where there is no squirrel control) young
trees seldom reach 30 years old (Gill et al. 1995). Thus, it
seems likely that gray squirrels will affect recruitment of
younger oak trees. In fact, diminished oak regeneration already
has been observed in some Vancouver Island stands
(K. Stewart, Garry Oak Meadow Preservation Society, 1997,
pers. comm.). It is not clear at this time whether gray squirrels
are the cause of this trend or a contributing factor.

Bark-stripping damage to trees

Research in Britain has shown that young oak trees (10–40
years old) are among the species most frequently barkstripped.
With all the other pressure on the endangered
Garry oak ecosystem, this additional threat could prove to
have severe consequences on the perpetuation of this habitat.
Damage to oaks often occurs in the crown, and detailed
surveys are required to see whether damage is occurring
where gray squirrels have colonized Garry oak forests."
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Re: Eastern Grey Squirrel, the new terror.

Post by Veovis »

kina wrote:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8sOw3mCz4Oc


Looks to me like they have more heart than we do sometimes...



I don't think they have more heart at all. I think I have enough heart that I could beat up a crow too, yeah, I'm pretty sure I could take a crow.
Cumungala
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Re: Eastern Grey Squirrel, the new terror.

Post by Cumungala »

Theres been lots of squirrels in my neighborhood lately. I don't know if they're the invasive kind but there wasn't any squirrels in my neighborhood until last spring.

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