Religious belief and intellect.

Is there a god? What is the meaning of life?
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fluffy
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Re: Religious belief and intellect.

Post by fluffy »

It's pretty hard to lay down blanket statements with any degree of accuracy given that there are so many different interpretations of what "God" is. This is where organized religions tend to fail in my opinion, many members are expected to take a particular interpretation as gospel (so to speak) without paying any attention to what their own intuition is telling them.
"The cleverest ruse of the Devil is to persuade you he does not exist."
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Born_again
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Re: Religious belief and intellect.

Post by Born_again »

Nabcom wrote:
Squire Nibs wrote:
Nabcom wrote:So it would seem to me a display of serious lack of intellect for anyone to assert, indeed even try to prove, they have the answer. Religious...; or not.


It would derail much of this thread, if the Christians would say "I don't really know if god exists"


Interestingly, in my own experience that is exactly what many (most?) of them would say, at least the reasonably intelligent ones. It's just too bad that many of those who are totally non -religious also have so much difficulty making the same statement.


Nabcom, why is it "just too bad"? Too bad for who? You? Me? Them? All of us?

I suspect that you are conveying your thoughts in a subjective manner, and so it seems fit that "it's too bad" for you. Only you have the answer to that.

Would you think "it's just too bad" if someone told you that without verifiable evidence for the existence of a tooth-fairy, they don't know that it exists? Really?! "it's just too bad", is it?

An open-minded person needs to demand evidence, for by virtue of their open-mindedness they are also liable to accept utter hogges toord without this simple filter. It is an infallible tool for representing and defending yourself as open-minded, regardless of your level of intellect; every time.


Is demanding evidence non-virtuous or "just too bad" because someone would prefer to qualify their thought through evidence-based reasoning?

Agree or disagree? Your call!
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NAB
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Re: Religious belief and intellect.

Post by NAB »

There is nothing to agree or disagree with B-A. I think you are reading far more into my comment than I intended. I didn't mean it in a personal sense at all as it being too bad for me (or anyone) if someone says God definitely does or does not exist(s)... Unless of course those with one view or the other are trying to shove it down my throat - in which case I reject both since I see it as a strictly personal matter. And I have no great need to "demand evidence" one way or the other either, nor do I feel particularly close minded rather than open-minded by adopting that position.... I know neither side can, or will in my lifetime at least, produce unquestionable evidence that definitely resolves the question....

....since personally I fully accept I don't know if God(s) exist(s) or not, and am not particularly troubled by acknowledging that. Hence I generally make no firm assertions one way or the other and, that being the case, tend not to listen much to either those who say he/she/it definitely does exist, nor to those who assert he/she/it definitely does not.

My intention in response to nib's comment ""...if the Christians would say "I don't really know if god exists"" ....was merely to suggest that far too many who believe he/she/it definitely does NOT seem too intellectually challenged to be able to acknowledge the same thing in the same way.

Nab
"He who controls others may be powerful, but he who has mastered himself is mightier still." - Lao-Tzu
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Born_again
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Re: Religious belief and intellect.

Post by Born_again »

Seems like there are many on both sides of the divide that would benefit enormously by watching the following:
Open-mindedness
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Glacier
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Re: Religious belief and intellect.

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"No one has the right to apologize for something they did not do, and no one has the right to accept an apology if the wrong was not done to them."
- Douglas Murray
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Nom_de_Plume
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Re: Religious belief and intellect.

Post by Nom_de_Plume »

This was an interesting study.
Kinda on topic but not quite but it didn't seem worth starting a new thread about.
Highly religious people are less motivated by compassion than are non-believers
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-04-highly-religious-people-compassion-non-believers.html
"Love thy neighbor" is preached from many a pulpit. But new research from the University of California, Berkeley, suggests that the highly religious are less motivated by compassion when helping a stranger than are atheists, agnostics and less religious people.
The trouble with having an open mind, of course, is that people will insist on coming along and trying to put things in it.
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Mr Danksworth
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Re: Religious belief and intellect.

Post by Mr Danksworth »

I think the studies that correlate religious belief and intellect fail to factor poverty into the equation. I feel that poverty leads to ill education and the need to cling to comforting superstitious beliefs. The stats indicate that the most poverty stricken are also the most religious.
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Glacier
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Re: Religious belief and intellect.

Post by Glacier »

Among the old folks (those over 50), the non-religious tend to be more educated, BUT among the under 50 (ie. the majority now), the religious are more educated than the non-religious.

This makes sense. When you're in a culture that's mostly religious, all the dumb people are religious (dumb people always just follow the crowd), but today with the decline of religion all the dumb people are not religious because that's the dominant culture.

Obviously I'm generalizing, so don't be one of these dumb people who wants to say there are exceptions.
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EDIT: this is an old thread, so wow, look at these old posters who haven't been here for awhile!

- SpazmoTheMagnificent (since 2012)
- FunkyBunch (2012)
- Mr Danksworth (2017)
- Phoenix Within (2016)
- RR24K (2012)
- hellomynameis (2016)
- grammafreddy (RIP)
- Nebula (2013)
- Born_again (2012)
- usquebaugh (2009)
- Mr. Personality (2011)
- NAB (RIP)
- chickenlittle (2011)
- Nom_de_Plume (2018)
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Re: Religious belief and intellect.

Post by BelieverinSciencethanks »

SpazmoTheMagnificent wrote: May 2nd, 2009, 2:57 am We know that the population of more developed countries, have higher intellect, in general, than less developed countries.
Does this fact ring true for different religions? Are followers of certain religions, by following the doctrine of said religion, less intelligent for doing so?

If yes, leads to my second question...

Are the religions that quell the growth of intellect within its followers, less peaceful in practice or more militant?
An indirect response. There are currently just over 5000 different Gods believed in by humanity around the world (throw Trump in there in 20 years or so to add one more, but I digress.) The question is, if God is almighty, wouldn't he (or she) impose or provide clarity about an almighty? Or, Occam's razor, God doesn't exist beyond humanities craving for meaning in the absence of understanding. As an atheist, I believe we find purpose in the lives we make for ourselves and our loved ones. I will live on in my family's memories. Good enough for me.

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