Abram came from Sumer?

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maryjane48
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Abram came from Sumer?

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In the height of the military prowess of the Nimrodian dynasty, the prince of the military hosts was led by the capable leadership of the Terah, the high priest of Ur, the royal heir to the House of Shem, and later high priest of Harran. and a leader which the “king and the princes loved him, and they elevated him very high… and dignified him above all his princes that were with him. (Book of Jasher 7:49,51. ibid, p. 16)

At the pinnacle of greatness, second in command of the empire of Sumer, Terah was wed to Amthelo, the daughter of Cornebo. To this union was born a son, Abram


http://www.biblesearchers.com/ancients/ ... ram1.shtml
LANDM
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Re: Abram came from Sumer?

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Hmmmmm......I didn't know that!
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maryjane48
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Re: Abram came from Sumer?

Post by maryjane48 »

yea and they had a flood to lol. but the real interesting thing is when you compare the hebrew bible to the history of sumer
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averagejoe
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Re: Abram came from Sumer?

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Interesting you talk about a flood in Sumer. Here is an article I read on a historian facebook page.

The Animals Went in Two by Two, According to Babylonian Ark Tablet

Recently translated Old Babylonian flood tablet describes how to build a circular ark

Noah Wiener • 01/29/2014

The so-called Ark Tablet, recently translated by Irving Finkel, is an Old Babylonian (1900-1700 B.C.E.) account of the flood in which the god Enki instructs Atrahasis—the Babylonian Noah—on how to build an ark. The twist? This Babylonian ark would have been circular.
We all know the story of Noah’s Ark. Ever since George Smith’s 1872 translation of Babylonian texts similar to the Biblical Deluge (see “George Smith’s Other Find” below), we’ve also known about echoes of the Genesis narrative in pre-Biblical Mesopotamian texts. A recently translated Old Babylonian (c. 1900–1700 B.C.) tablet has literally reshaped our vision of the Babylonian vessel used to weather the storm and builds bridges across the floodwaters dividing the Biblical and Mesopotamian accounts of the flood.

Read the whole article...

http://www.biblicalarchaeology.org/dail ... rk-tablet/
Ecclesiastes 10:2 A wise man's heart is at his right hand; but a fool's heart at his left.

Thor Heyerdahl Says: “Our lack of knowledge about our own past is appalling.
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averagejoe
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Re: Abram came from Sumer?

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Babylonian Ark Tablet


Image
Ecclesiastes 10:2 A wise man's heart is at his right hand; but a fool's heart at his left.

Thor Heyerdahl Says: “Our lack of knowledge about our own past is appalling.
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maryjane48
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Re: Abram came from Sumer?

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How do we know that the Sumerian myths came before the biblical myths? In the bible Abraham is said to come from the city of Ur of the Chaldeas. That means that Abraham would have come out of the middle east and been aware of the myths, customs, and beliefs of the people of Ur.

Abraham was thought to have lived sometime around 1850 BC. This would have placed him as a contemporary with Sargon the first of Assyria, not to be confused with Sargon the great founder of the Akkadian Dynasty, according to G. Roux. He would have been an Akkadian speaking person from Babylon. This would have been long before the Chaldeans, but the city would still be the same.

The bible described Abraham's behavior and the behavior of those who were with him and we can easily see that they were shining examples of what an Akkadian of the day would have been like. He was gracious as both a host and a guest. He was loyal to his personal god, going so far as to make a traditional covenant with him.

This connection is important. Some have argued over the years that the early parts of the bible were simply stories made up for entertainment or for other reasons. This connection shows not only where the myths come from, but it puts them in a context that makes sense for the culture of the day.

Over time this man who followed many gods would give rise to a people who recognized many gods but followed only one as we can see in the time of Moses. From there they would go through the reforms of Leviticus and develop into the strictly monotheistic people that we think of today as the Jews. From there the monotheism would break down into a triumvirate with an evil god as their rival and be added to a host of saints and angels to become the Christian pantheon of today.




http://www.templeofsumer.org/biblicalpar.html

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