Karma, Hinduism, intention & quantum physics

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steven lloyd
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Karma, Hinduism, intention & quantum physics

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Karma is a fundamental concept in Hinduism, and it refers to the idea that every action has a consequence, either in this life or in future lives. While karma is often thought of as a spiritual or philosophical concept, there is actually a surprising amount of overlap between the principles of karma and the laws of physics.

What is Karma?

Karma is a Sanskrit word that means "action" or "deed," and it is a central concept in Hinduism. According to the principles of karma, every action we take has a consequence, either in this life or in future lives. Good actions lead to positive consequences, while bad actions lead to negative consequences.

The Physics of Cause and Effect: The Law of Action and Reaction

The most famous principles of physics is Newton's third law, which states that for every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction. This principle aligns with the concept of karma, which suggests that every action we take has a consequence, whether positive or negative. Just as a force applied to an object will result in a corresponding reaction, the actions we take in life will result in corresponding consequences. This Physics of cause and effect that every action has a corresponding reaction is mirrored in Hinduism which reflects that the state of the universe at any given time is the result of all the previous actions that have taken place.

The Law of Conservation of Energy

An important principle of physics that relates to the concept of karma is the law of conservation of energy. This law states that energy cannot be created or destroyed, only transferred from one form to another. In the same way, the energy that we put into our actions, whether positive or negative, will be transferred and have an effect on the world around us.

The Butterfly Effect and The Principle of Interconnectedness

Another important principle of physics that aligns with the concept of karma is the idea of interconnectedness. In physics, this principle is often referred to as the butterfly effect. The butterfly effect is a concept in chaos theory which suggests that small changes in one part of a system can have far-reaching and unpredictable consequences in other parts of the system. Similarly, the actions we take in life can have ripple effects that extend beyond our immediate surroundings, affecting people and events in ways that we may not even be aware of. This idea is similar to the concept of karma, which suggests that even small actions can have profound effects on our lives and the lives of others.

The Role of Intention and The Importance of Mindfulness

In Hinduism, the intention behind an action is just as important as the action itself. This is similar to the concept of intentionality in physics, which suggests that the outcome of an action is influenced by the intentions of the person performing the action. In another word, mindfulness is a key component of the practice of karma. By being mindful of our actions and intentions, we can ensure that we are acting in accordance with our values and principles. This is similar to the principle of mindfulness in physics, which suggests that the act of observation can have an effect on the outcome of an experiment. By being mindful of our observations and taking care to avoid interfering with the system being observed, we can ensure that our results are accurate and meaningful.

The Concept of Non-Duality

In Hinduism, the concept of non-duality suggests that everything in the universe is interconnected and ultimately one. This aligns with the concept of entanglement in quantum mechanics, which suggests that particles can become entangled and affect each other even when they are separated by great distances. Both of these concepts suggest that the universe is more interconnected than we may have previously thought, and that our actions can have far-reaching consequences that extend beyond our immediate surroundings.

The Importance of Self-Reflection

In order to fully understand the concept of karma, it is important to engage in self-reflection and examine our actions and intentions. This is similar to the scientific method, which encourages us to question our assumptions and beliefs and examine the evidence before us.

Conclusion

Overall, the science of karma and the principles of physics align in many ways, suggesting that there is a deep underlying order to the universe that is governed by fundamental principles of cause and effect, interconnectedness, and mindfulness. Recognizing these connections, can give us a deeper understanding of the world around us and our place within it. By engaging in self-reflection and considering the consequences of our actions, we can strive to live in harmony with the world around us and create a better future for ourselves and for others.
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Re: Karma, Hinduism, intention & quantum physics

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Sorry but if you research the war on Muslims in India, I mean delve into Aljeeza's articles about what it is to be Muslim in some areas of India, you can't believe Karma is playing much into their belief systems. Unless Muslims don't count.
As WW3 develops, no one is going to be dissing the "preppers." What have you done?
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Re: Karma, Hinduism, intention & quantum physics

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steven lloyd wrote: Sep 25th, 2023, 2:59 pm Karma is a fundamental concept in Hinduism, and it refers to the idea that every action has a consequence, either in this life or in future lives. While karma is often thought of as a spiritual or philosophical concept, there is actually a surprising amount of overlap between the principles of karma and the laws of physics.

What is Karma?

Karma is a Sanskrit word that means "action" or "deed," and it is a central concept in Hinduism. According to the principles of karma, every action we take has a consequence, either in this life or in future lives. Good actions lead to positive consequences, while bad actions lead to negative consequences.

The Physics of Cause and Effect: The Law of Action and Reaction

The most famous principles of physics is Newton's third law, which states that for every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction. This principle aligns with the concept of karma, which suggests that every action we take has a consequence, whether positive or negative. Just as a force applied to an object will result in a corresponding reaction, the actions we take in life will result in corresponding consequences. This Physics of cause and effect that every action has a corresponding reaction is mirrored in Hinduism which reflects that the state of the universe at any given time is the result of all the previous actions that have taken place.

The Law of Conservation of Energy

An important principle of physics that relates to the concept of karma is the law of conservation of energy. This law states that energy cannot be created or destroyed, only transferred from one form to another. In the same way, the energy that we put into our actions, whether positive or negative, will be transferred and have an effect on the world around us.

The Butterfly Effect and The Principle of Interconnectedness

Another important principle of physics that aligns with the concept of karma is the idea of interconnectedness. In physics, this principle is often referred to as the butterfly effect. The butterfly effect is a concept in chaos theory which suggests that small changes in one part of a system can have far-reaching and unpredictable consequences in other parts of the system. Similarly, the actions we take in life can have ripple effects that extend beyond our immediate surroundings, affecting people and events in ways that we may not even be aware of. This idea is similar to the concept of karma, which suggests that even small actions can have profound effects on our lives and the lives of others.

The Role of Intention and The Importance of Mindfulness

In Hinduism, the intention behind an action is just as important as the action itself. This is similar to the concept of intentionality in physics, which suggests that the outcome of an action is influenced by the intentions of the person performing the action. In another word, mindfulness is a key component of the practice of karma. By being mindful of our actions and intentions, we can ensure that we are acting in accordance with our values and principles. This is similar to the principle of mindfulness in physics, which suggests that the act of observation can have an effect on the outcome of an experiment. By being mindful of our observations and taking care to avoid interfering with the system being observed, we can ensure that our results are accurate and meaningful.

The Concept of Non-Duality

In Hinduism, the concept of non-duality suggests that everything in the universe is interconnected and ultimately one. This aligns with the concept of entanglement in quantum mechanics, which suggests that particles can become entangled and affect each other even when they are separated by great distances. Both of these concepts suggest that the universe is more interconnected than we may have previously thought, and that our actions can have far-reaching consequences that extend beyond our immediate surroundings.

The Importance of Self-Reflection

In order to fully understand the concept of karma, it is important to engage in self-reflection and examine our actions and intentions. This is similar to the scientific method, which encourages us to question our assumptions and beliefs and examine the evidence before us.

Conclusion

Overall, the science of karma and the principles of physics align in many ways, suggesting that there is a deep underlying order to the universe that is governed by fundamental principles of cause and effect, interconnectedness, and mindfulness. Recognizing these connections, can give us a deeper understanding of the world around us and our place within it. By engaging in self-reflection and considering the consequences of our actions, we can strive to live in harmony with the world around us and create a better future for ourselves and for others.
Truly impressed, deeply, with your journey into cause and effect, the outcomes near and far reaching.

I see a difference in your posting style, for the better. :biggrin: It has to be because you're paying attention to ‘down the road posts ‘ made much later, by others. Cause and effect.

Personally, I am still having difficulties being ‘in the moment’ and not riding the roller-coaster to disaster as my overly anxious self demands. Every time I am NOT paying close attention, a stick is thrown into my spokes.

We live, we learn, we succeed and we fail.

Circle of life.
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steven lloyd
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Re: Karma, Hinduism, intention & quantum physics

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A text from my Buddhist friend sharing her musings on consciousness ...

This is my current rabbit hole: Just as there is electrically neutral matter and electrically charged matter, so there is insentient matter and sentient matter—these are just two types of matter. An electromagnetic field is a type of material reality, and so is consciousness. Alternatively, consciousness is one form of energy, along with kinetic energy or electrical energy. If this hypothesis is true, then consciousness is material after all—though not in the Cartesian sense. Matter/energy is the underlying substance of the universe, and it may ultimately be unitary, but it can take widely different forms—with consciousness as just one of them.

In the absolute quietude and clarity, I could see what I really am. At the moment of awakening, the answer I had been seeking and longing for was obvious, compelling, and indisputable: “The cosmic energy is my energy and my energy is the cosmic energy. The cosmic mind is my mind, and my mind is the cosmic mind.”

I realized that the reality of the universe is energy-consciousness, and it is also what I am. It was a direct seeing or knowing, not learning. It just is, and that is what I truly am. This unity doesn’t have any shape or borders, and is not bound by time and space. Paradoxically, the closest word that we can find in our language to describe this enormously great, infinitely powerful, all-knowing reality that creates, sustains, and regulates the cosmos is: Nothing. It is not a thing nor an object. It has no qualities or characteristics. It is the unmanifested source of all, pure Being, One-without-a-second.
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Re: Karma, Hinduism, intention & quantum physics

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I do enjoy how lovely they rake the grounds at the Buddhist Temple here... I only just found out a fair number of Vietnamese people are Buddhists
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Re: Karma, Hinduism, intention & quantum physics

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Raking gravel into perfect flowing lines is a form of deep meditation.

By extension, so is any form of work or endeavour. I love how every shrub, tree (no matter how huge it is) and plant is tended to with complete devotion and close attention in Japan. Is it from ‘pride’ or just doing a job, well done and satisfying

I try to remember this as I clean the bathroom.
Sufficiently advanced incompetence is indistinguishable from malice. There’s a certain point at which ignorance becomes malice, at which there is simply no way to become THAT ignorant except deliberately and maliciously.

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Re: Karma, Hinduism, intention & quantum physics

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Cleaning def works for me. I did take a meditation course, but I spent the time thinking about my to - do list.
Shaolin are amazing
Had a Buddhist monk in a ESL class, he just sat i his robe smiling - I don't think he had a word of English. All the students were very respectful of him
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Re: Karma, Hinduism, intention & quantum physics

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normaM wrote: Oct 2nd, 2023, 6:37 am Cleaning def works for me. I did take a meditation course, but I spent the time thinking about my to - do list.
Shaolin are amazing
Had a Buddhist monk in a ESL class, he just sat i his robe smiling - I don't think he had a word of English. All the students were very respectful of him
Where did the B. Monk come from? The Tibetan escapees are worthy of extra respect and admiration. Escaping the clutches of China is death-defying if successful, and if not, death dealt out by Chinese border guards is painful and tortuous
Sufficiently advanced incompetence is indistinguishable from malice. There’s a certain point at which ignorance becomes malice, at which there is simply no way to become THAT ignorant except deliberately and maliciously.

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Re: Karma, Hinduism, intention & quantum physics

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Catsumi wrote: Oct 1st, 2023, 6:15 pm I try to remember this as I clean the bathroom.
Cat, I thought of this last comment of yours when I read this quote from "Zen and the Art of Saving the Planet" by Thich Nhat Hanh. Something you might ponder the next time you're cleaning your bathroom.

"A bodhisattva is a living being (sattva) who has woken up (bodhi). Anyone with happiness, mindfulness, peace, understanding, and love can be called a bodhisattva. Bodhisattvas have a deep aspiration to help others, and that aspiration is a tremendous source of energy and vitality. Bodhisattvas aren’t only human. A deer, a monkey, a mango tree, or a rock can all be called bodhisattvas because they are offering freshness, beauty, and refuge to the world. Bodhisattvas aren’t great beings up in the clouds, or statues of metal or wood on an altar; they are all around us. The pine in the front yard can be a bodhisattva offering peace, oxygen, and joy. The Diamond Sutra reminds us that, if we’re caught in the sign “human,” we won’t be able to see the buddhas and bodhisattvas all around. In Buddhism we consider the planet to be a bodhisattva: a real, authentic, great bodhisattva. One of Earth’s many names is “Great Refreshing Earth Bodhisattva.” Our planet is the most beautiful of all bodhisattvas."

Start reading this book for free: https://a.co/5vR58ZB
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Re: Karma, Hinduism, intention & quantum physics

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Thanks, read many books on the subject and still more to go. :200:

A very old story: Whilst living in a cave, much deprived of the necessities of life, an aspiring monk sat cross-legged, transfixed in front of a small oil lamp’s burning candle. So deep in thought he didn’t notice a very large serpent crawling over him that eventually left.

His friends asked him when he came out of the cave, “hey man, weren’t you terrified when the serpent slithered over your body??”

He replied “ no, didn’t see a serpent, but I did see a bodhisattva though”.


(Me, I’d be screeching)
Sufficiently advanced incompetence is indistinguishable from malice. There’s a certain point at which ignorance becomes malice, at which there is simply no way to become THAT ignorant except deliberately and maliciously.

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Re: Karma, Hinduism, intention & quantum physics

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Love it :up:

If you ever find the time to really twist up your mind try reading "The Quantum and the Lotus" - a discussion between a Buddhist monk turned quantum physicist and a quantum physicist turned Buddhist monk.
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Re: Karma, Hinduism, intention & quantum physics

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steven lloyd wrote: Oct 12th, 2023, 5:51 pm Love it :up:

If you ever find the time to really twist up your mind try reading "The Quantum and the Lotus" - a discussion between a Buddhist monk turned quantum physicist and a quantum physicist turned Buddhist monk.
Weird, isn’t it? Most religions turn away from science while Buddhist beliefs incorporate Science and get along quite well in doing so.

Which came first? Does it really matter?

We are stardust

Go figure
Sufficiently advanced incompetence is indistinguishable from malice. There’s a certain point at which ignorance becomes malice, at which there is simply no way to become THAT ignorant except deliberately and maliciously.

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Re: Karma, Hinduism, intention & quantum physics

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Catsumi wrote: Oct 12th, 2023, 7:59 pm Most religions turn away from science while Buddhist beliefs incorporate Science and get along quite well in doing so.
I've long given up the notion of the God in heaven I had as a kid. I'm not an atheist but by definition would consider myself agnostic in that I believe "God" (whatever "It" is) is unknowable. I'm not smart enough to call myself a quantum physicist. I'm probably not as smart as most Buddhists (need to meditate on that). However, the ideas put forward are intriguing, even mind-bending, and provide an explanation of the possible nature of what "God" might be.

Theories of quantum physics state everything, energy and matter, is connected at a subatomic level; that space is not empty, and that this connection exists across an infinite universe and an infinite number of infinite universes. Even if just similar to gravity it makes sense to believe there is some kind of force that holds all this together.

We are stardust
True. The Big Bang produced stars and galaxies of stars that produced the stuff that planets were made from and then solar systems. From that came life, and then - sentient consciousness. While it would just be a guess to propose the universe had intent that this would be the outcome of it's creation, we can say that was it's purpose in the same sense we can say evolution has purpose or that gravity has purpose.
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Re: Karma, Hinduism, intention & quantum physics

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I happened to come across this youtube and thought I’d drop it into this thread.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cDLdgxEEDOU
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Re: Karma, Hinduism, intention & quantum physics

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steven lloyd wrote: Oct 13th, 2023, 5:42 am
Catsumi wrote: Oct 12th, 2023, 7:59 pm Most religions turn away from science while Buddhist beliefs incorporate Science and get along quite well in doing so.
I've long given up the notion of the God in heaven I had as a kid. I'm not an atheist but by definition would consider myself agnostic in that I believe "God" (whatever "It" is) is unknowable. I'm not smart enough to call myself a quantum physicist. I'm probably not as smart as most Buddhists (need to meditate on that). However, the ideas put forward are intriguing, even mind-bending, and provide an explanation of the possible nature of what "God" might be.

Theories of quantum physics state everything, energy and matter, is connected at a subatomic level; that space is not empty, and that this connection exists across an infinite universe and an infinite number of infinite universes. Even if just similar to gravity it makes sense to believe there is some kind of force that holds all this together.

We are stardust
True. The Big Bang produced stars and galaxies of stars that produced the stuff that planets were made from and then solar systems. From that came life, and then - sentient consciousness. While it would just be a guess to propose the universe had intent that this would be the outcome of it's creation, we can say that was it's purpose in the same sense we can say evolution has purpose or that gravity has purpose.
Another way of describing it .. it's fractal.
Of all the faiths, stories, religions.. this as as close to our ancient beginnings we can get.
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