Picture a wave

Is there a god? What is the meaning of life?
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steven lloyd
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Picture a wave

Post by steven lloyd »

https://youtu.be/C8CWzvNwzzo?si=Cf9bPZUR66kcJln9

Picture a wave. It starts far out in the ocean and from initial conditions it's energy is changed into the form of a wave. It exists distinctly for awhile and then crashes and once again becomes one with the ocean. Although distinct, the water that was contained within the wave was always connected to and a part of the ocean, and that ocean was always connected to and a part of every ocean.

According to quantum physics everything, all energy and matter, is connected at a subatomic level across an infinite universe and across an infinite number of universes that are not empty but full of dark matter and anti matter. From some as yet unexplained initial conditions the creation of our universe led to the creation of stars which led to the creation of galaxies which led to the creation of planets which led to the creation of life and, ultimately, conscious life.

Consciousness has been determined to be a form of energy. As we exist in this temporary form it provides, among other things, self-awareness and a sense of self identity. However, there is evidence that this consciousness is not necessarily constrained only within our bodies and that it can/does exist outside of our bodies as well - although we (most of us?) do not consciously have this awareness.

Many people might have heard the story of some anthropologists studying a group of monkeys on some tropical island. They observed that at some point these monkeys started to wash the fruit they were eating. They were interested to observe that at about the same time, with no physical contact between them, a group of monkeys on a nearby island started to do the same thing.

People who practice meditation - that is, the practice of stopping thinking and reaching a meditative state where brain waves actually change - report it is easier to reach this meditative state when practicing with a group as opposed to practicing by themselves. I can confirm that I have experienced the same when I attended a few workshops on meditation.

I was also very fascinated by a study that was done at MIT where a supercomputer was programmed to randomly generate a massive amount of binary numbers at a great speed. Initially they ran the program to test statistical probability and, as expected, after running the program numerous times the results consistently came close to 50-50. However, when someone got the idea to place a human subject in the adjoining room and instructed them as to what was happening and to think about it while the program was running the results were skewed. There was no predictable fashion to which way they were skewed but is was measurable.

All of these examples imply (not prove) that consciousness can and does exist outside of our bodies and is not limited by them. Quantum physics would suggest that, as a form of energy, all of our consciouses are connected at some subatomic level, and even further to that, connected to everything as everything is connected at some subatomic level. If that is true (and quantum physicists tell us it is) then is there some purposeful force (purposeful in the sense gravity has purpose) that holds it all together? Could we call this force a universal consciousness, although not the type of consciousness that we could describe.

Our experience of our life here is temporary, and both Buddhists and quantum physicists agree much a function of perception. Are we really distinct entities as we tend to presume or are we, in fact, connected to and part of something much more all- encompassing - like an ocean or, in our case, the universe? Physicists will also tell us that energy (consciousness) cannot be destroyed, but it can be changed (into non-consciousness or ...?). I suspect that, like a wave, when I pass my conscious energy will still exist, but like a wave that has crashed that energy will have changed and I will no longer have self-identity and will just be a part of the universe from whence I came.
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steven lloyd
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Re: Picture a wave

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From "Twelve Steps to Religionless Spirituality: The Power of Spirituality with or without God" by Ward B. Ewing -

"The question of God’s existence is no longer about whether there is another being in addition to the universe. Rather the question becomes . . . What is reality? Is it simply the space-time world of matter and energy as disclosed by ordinary sense perception and contemporary science? Or is it suffused by a “more,” a radiant and glorious more? A theology that takes mystical experiences seriously leads to a very different understanding of the referent of the word “God.” The word no longer refers to a being separate from the universe, but to a reality, a “more,” a radiant and luminous presence that permeates everything that is."
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Re: Picture a wave

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From "The Quantum and the Lotus"

"... the physical constants and consciousness have always coexisted in a universe that has no beginning and no end. I don't mean that the universe is static. Rather I mean that what seems to be the start of the universe, the Big Bang for instance, is just one episode in an unbroken process. The conditions of our present universe harmonize with those of the previous and subsequent ones, because the process of causality is unbroken and entails a compatibility between the nature of the cause and that of the effect.

The universe and consciousness have always coexisted and so cannot exclude each other. To coexist, phenomena must be mutually suitable."
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Re: Picture a wave

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At the deepest level, meditation practice reveals mind to be an open, nonconceptual awareness, which is the ultimate source of all our particular experiences. If surface mind is like whitecaps and body-mind is like waves, then the deeper, unconditioned essence of mind is like the ocean itself, which makes possible and infuses all the activity happening on its surface. The waves and whitecaps represent becoming—our changing, evolving nature—while the ocean itself is Being, our changeless nature.

The energy play of the body-mind in turn arises from the dharmakaya, the ultimate ground of human existence—pure unconditioned awareness. In Buddhist psychology, this formless ground of being is variously called mind-as-such, big mind, no-mind, unborn mind, or mind-essence. It is the ground of silence underlying and contained in sound, the ground of stillness underlying and contained in movement, the ground of nonconceptuality underlying and hidden within all thinking and feeling. As the unconditioned ground of being implicit in all becoming, it is the basis for the development of wisdom, enlightenment, true liberation, and reconciliation with life and death.

John Welwood (American psychotherapist and Buddhist): 'Toward a Psychology of Awakening.'
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Re: Picture a wave

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From "The Dalai Lama’s Cat and the Claw of Attraction" by David Michie -

"After the rumbles had subsided, Heidi looked at Rinpoche, “What I find so … hard about Buddhism, is this idea that animals have no souls.” She shook her head. “Humans neither. In some ways, Buddhism is so close to my way of thinking about consciousness. But then there’s this … nothing idea about no spirit, no soul.”

“Ah, shunyata!” Rinpoche nodded, at the same time appearing light and untroubled. “It can be a difficult subject,” he acknowledged. On either side of him, Franc and Serena leaned back against their seats. Heidi, it appeared, had come up against a Dharma obstacle that was very familiar. “It’s true that in Buddhism we have no idea of a soul or spirit, like in other religious traditions. No permanent self or essence. This is not something we have.”

“You see!” Heidi’s face was crunched in an unfamiliar expression of anguish. “This is so sad.” “Is it?” Rinpoche shrugged, in an easygoing manner. “Why?” It took her a while to find her answer. “What’s the point of your life, what’s the point of doing anything, if I turn into nothing when I die?” Before he could respond, she said, “Not nothing. I understand that. But no more Heidi.” “Correct,” he agreed. “No more Heidi.”

Then after a moment, “You have a strong feeling of being Heidi, of Heidi-ness, that you don’t want taken away?”
"Of course!”
"Good!” His eyes were lucent. “Remember this. Hold on to it tightly, because it is the idea to be refuted.”

“Refuted?” Heidi exclaimed, as a new clap of thunder rolled across the sky. “The idea we generally have of ourselves is quite unfortunate,” Rinpoche had an inclusive way of speaking, as if he was like everyone else, rather than a highly realized yogi. “We have this notion of a being who is the size of a human with a mind the size of a brain. An idea that’s fixed and very small. Limited. But in reality, no permanent thing can ever be found. Not about us, not about any phenomenon in existence. Everything is in a state of constant change.”

{snip}

“Nothing comes from nothing. Everything is in constant change.” Heidi and Ricardo were nodding, following his explanation. Rinpoche leaned towards them. “Same with us,” he said. “The continuity of discontinuity, Chogyam Trungpa used to call it. This is why we don’t talk about the essence of a person. Of some permanent being. Even within one human life – which is very short – the a person aged six is different from the same person aged twenty or fifty or the elderly person at eighty. We use the same label our whole life, for something that’s always changing. But in our mind, we believe it is more than just a label – we think there is something else there. Something we make up and believe to be true, because that’s what everyone else is doing.”


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steven lloyd
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Re: Picture a wave

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