Policing Solution for Kelowna

Policing Solution for Kelowna

Postby Jonrox » Jan 8th, 2019, 8:29 am

In light of the issues we're facing in Kelowna, I thought I'd share a policing model that's having success in other cities across North America.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton/edmonton-police-chief-dale-mcfee-samson-cree-nation-vernon-saddleback-crime-safety-1.4961657

I cherry picked bits and pieces from the article... but you should click through to read the entire thing.

Now, a key part of the community's safety strategy, it's known as the Hub model — a multi-agency intervention that mobilizes social services for those in need before harm is done.

The model is used by about 140 locations in North America including Charlottetown, Ottawa, Toronto and Surrey.

Twice a week, representatives from community agencies, police, child welfare, schools and other groups discuss cases around a "Hub table" for 90 minutes.

Information is shared, but some details are withheld, where necessary, to protect privacy.

The goal is to offer services within 24 to 48 hours to reduce risk factors such as substance abuse, mental health issues or family violence. It often involves knocking on someone's door or meeting with family members.

In Saskatchewan, McFee said, 81 per cent of police calls for service don't lead to criminal charges. He suspects it's similar in Edmonton.

"That right there tells you that we're asking the police to be the social worker, the mental health worker and everything else," he said.

The Hub takes people out of the justice system and puts them on the path to recovery while reducing demand for services. "It's way more advantageous to the individual who needs the service and obviously it's a heck of a lot more cost effective," McFee said.

In Saskatchewan, the information is collected in a data base created with the Ministry of Justice and the University of Saskatchewan to shape policy and improve service delivery. Government staff support Hub tables by troubleshooting and fielding questions.

"At the end of the day you can't fix what you don't know," said McFee. "So we use that data proactively to figure out how we can actually start to focus on the right thing."

He emphasized the approach is not about being soft on crime, but rather being smart about community safety. "We need to put the bad people in jail and not the poor souls," McFee told Edmonton media in November.

"If your only response is the justice system, what you tend to do is you don't do a very good job of sorting intake and you overload your justice system."

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Re: Policing Solution for Kelowna

Postby JayByrd » Jan 8th, 2019, 9:33 am

In most cases, by the time a person is committing crimes, the damage is done...they may not be a lifelong criminal, but they've already strayed far from the path of being a healthy, productive person. Any intervention before that point is a good thing. I'd love to see this introduced here.
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Re: Policing Solution for Kelowna

Postby Jonrox » Jan 9th, 2019, 1:43 pm

All these people whining and complaining about crime in other threads, but just 1 comment on a solution being used successfully in many other cities in North America. This leads me to ask, do people really want to discuss solutions or do they just want to whine about the problems?

Would these folks be happy if the problems got a bit better or be upset because they have less to complain about?

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Re: Policing Solution for Kelowna

Postby GenesisGT » Jan 9th, 2019, 5:05 pm

Looking at the Glasgow program which seems to be the first city to implement this type of program, they were the murder capital of Europe when it was recognized that something different had to be done. And now the program in Scotland is looked at as the program to be copied or based on when implementing else where.

What would drive some people nuts with the Glasgow program is that not only was this program seen as an everyone get together and we will lower the crime rate, but

There were legislative changes, too. The VRU lobbied successfully for increases in maximum sentences for carrying knives. Where previously those caught with a blade were allowed back on their street while their case slowly progressed through the justice system, now once caught they were fingerprinted, DNA-swabbed and held in custody until court.


Funded primarily by the Scottish government, CIRV combined the carrot and the stick. Gang members were given a choice: renounce violence and get help into education, training and employment, or face zero tolerance on the street.


Stop and search has been used excessively, with young men in deprived communities disproportionately targeted.


So what caused the decrease in criminal activity, probably a combination of the program and the above,

In Glasgow they changed laws, had zero tolerance and stop and search being used excessively.

I have no problem with a program attacking the crime problem using all the tools in the tool box.

Some of the things used in Glasgow I presume would get the human rights people up in arms, but if that is what it takes a balance of good and ugly tools then go for it.

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2015/apr/06/glasgow-murder-rate-knife-gang-crime-police
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Re: Policing Solution for Kelowna

Postby Jonrox » Jan 10th, 2019, 12:44 pm

Edmonton incoming police chief's popular crime-fighting strategy embraced in central Alberta
https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton/ponoka-samson-cree-edmonton-dale-mcfee-police-chief-crime-community-safety-social-issues-1.4962520
While the official Hub training costs each community from $15,000 to $45,000, Maskwacis RCMP has developed a local version it offers for free.

Seems like a deal that's way too good to pass up.
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