Stop the Spray

Re: Stop the Spray

Postby fluffy » Jan 3rd, 2019, 8:28 am

Just to put this in perspective, the 12,000 hectares of sprayed area mentioned in the article represents .0002 percent of BC’s 60 million hectares of forested area.
Okey dokey doggie daddy.
User avatar
fluffy
Buddha of the Board
 
Posts: 19380
Likes: 342 posts
Liked in: 4371 posts
Joined: Jun 1st, 2006, 5:42 pm
Location: Ogo

Re: Stop the Spray

Postby Fancy » Jan 3rd, 2019, 8:32 am

Not sure if anyone read this from the link I posted:

http://stopthespraybc.com/

Fixer 166 started this topic last September.
Fancy this, Fancy that and by the way, T*t for Tat
User avatar
Fancy
Grand Pilgrim
 
Posts: 49053
Likes: 1465 posts
Liked in: 7558 posts
Joined: Apr 15th, 2006, 6:23 pm

Re: Stop the Spray

Postby dirtybiker » Jan 3rd, 2019, 4:09 pm

twobits wrote:
dirtybiker wrote:Not up to speed on present day practices.
Throughout the mid to late 80's and through a good part of the 90's that is
exactly what we did.
Fertilize post harvest, post re-plant, reforestation projects by helicopter, I was led to believe that
the conifer growth was accelerated by 50%.


And how has replant from helicopter dropped plugs of tree seedlings worked out? LOL.

Horrible. Stupid idea to get the plug into mineral soil rather than bounce off slash or a rock.


Sorry, once again a post goes sideways due to lack of
proper conveyance.

Harvest, then re-plant, the traditional feet on the ground,babies (plugs) in hand.
Then the use of helicopters to distribute the prill fertilizer throughout the replant zone.


Hopper bottom semi offload prill fertilizer via conveyor to a scale bag then dumped into a
hopper device long lined beneath said helicopter.
The hopper has two gas engines, like a lawnmower, spinning 'blades/fans to disperse
fertilizer in a spray type fashion.
The same crew that planted the babies also had a secondary chore of placing wire racks
with plastic bags (think kitchen catcher) throughout the targeted zone.
Then after a few passes are made, said bags could be marked and collected for review of
proper coverage of the zone.

A little clearer now, my fault for trying to keep it short and simple in my
original post.
What was I thinking ? :135:
Last edited by dirtybiker on Jan 3rd, 2019, 4:54 pm, edited 1 time in total.
"Don't 'p' down my neck then tell me it's raining!"

Catsumi likes this post.
dirtybiker
Guru
 
Posts: 7444
Likes: 8619 posts
Liked in: 3700 posts
Joined: Mar 8th, 2008, 7:00 pm
Location: Central OK

Re: Stop the Spray

Postby dirtybiker » Jan 3rd, 2019, 4:13 pm

^^^And a video to paint it absolute and clear.


Hope that's enough to clear thing up !
"Don't 'p' down my neck then tell me it's raining!"

seewood likes this post.
dirtybiker
Guru
 
Posts: 7444
Likes: 8619 posts
Liked in: 3700 posts
Joined: Mar 8th, 2008, 7:00 pm
Location: Central OK

Re: Stop the Spray

Postby twobits » Jan 3rd, 2019, 7:36 pm

Do Section 8 cost deductions still exist to claim against stump-age costs that are actually the revenue source of the Province?
Do not argue with an idiot. He will drag you down to his level and beat you with experience.

The problem with the gene pool is that there is no lifeguard.
twobits
Guru
 
Posts: 7176
Likes: 1066 posts
Liked in: 3798 posts
Joined: Nov 25th, 2010, 9:44 am
Location: GPS says Dead Elbow Utah. Think I'm lost

Re: Stop the Spray

Postby Casus Belli » Jan 11th, 2019, 11:38 pm

*removed*
Last edited by ferri on Jan 12th, 2019, 11:03 am, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: Off Topic
Casus Belli
 
Posts: 64
Likes: 5 posts
Liked in: 18 posts
Joined: Dec 13th, 2010, 7:43 pm

Re: Stop the Spray

Postby Fancy » Feb 8th, 2019, 7:01 am

"When a boreal forest regrows after logging, it is a paradise for wildlife like bees, moose, birds, and beavers, with a large selection of food including fireweed, poplar (aspen), birch, willow, grass, and many other plants that are critical to wildlife," the petition states.

“However, to industrial forestry, only one type of tree has value – conifer trees like Lodgepole Pine. Utilizing helicopters equipped with spray nozzles and tanks of herbicides, companies spray these cutblocks five - 10 years after logging with industrial-strength glyphosate to kill every plant that isn't a conifer. The effects are devastating and long-lasting, as a forest without aspen will support far fewer wildlife, and especially moose, than one with.”


https://www.castanet.net/edition/news-s ... htm#248776
Fancy this, Fancy that and by the way, T*t for Tat

2 people like this post.
User avatar
Fancy
Grand Pilgrim
 
Posts: 49053
Likes: 1465 posts
Liked in: 7558 posts
Joined: Apr 15th, 2006, 6:23 pm

Re: Stop the Spray

Postby Fancy » May 21st, 2019, 12:14 pm

The B.C. forests ministry is reducing its use of the herbicide glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup, partly to help moose get enough feed through the winter in the B.C. Interior.


https://www.columbiavalleypioneer.com/b ... lyphosate/
Fancy this, Fancy that and by the way, T*t for Tat

alanjh595 likes this post.
User avatar
Fancy
Grand Pilgrim
 
Posts: 49053
Likes: 1465 posts
Liked in: 7558 posts
Joined: Apr 15th, 2006, 6:23 pm

Previous

Return to B.C.

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: CommonCrawl [Bot] and 1 guest