2019 an election year

Re: 2019 an election year

Postby d0nb » Jan 9th, 2019, 11:07 pm

It strains credulity to imagine that those who pay to suffer the company of politicians might expect nothing in return.
“The whole modern world has divided itself into Conservatives and Progressives. The business of Progressives is to go on making mistakes. The business of the Conservatives is to prevent the mistakes from being corrected.” ― G.K. Chesterton April 19, 1924

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Re: 2019 an election year

Postby d0nb » Jan 9th, 2019, 11:29 pm

The Green Barbarian wrote:
Omnitheo wrote:
Pointing out that something someone says is wrong, when there is factual evidence proving so is not bullying. It is educating.


Except that this wasn't done. And trying to compare these bunch of drunken sailor Liberals to the Conservatives is ridiculous. The Liberals haven't had to fight a recession at all, and still are spending like drunken sailors. Just awful.


At least drunken sailors spend their own money. Imagine what would happen if they could just add their bills to the national debt.

As you say, unlike Harper, Trudeau hasn't faced a recession. He also hasn't been threatened by a coalition of losers who insist on massive increases in government spending. Even so, he has failed miserably in keeping his promise to hold his deficit spending to less than $30 billion and to balance the budget during his mandate. Instead, he will add over $70 billion to the debt and now admits that under the Liberals, Canada will suffer deficits for decades. Fail.
“The whole modern world has divided itself into Conservatives and Progressives. The business of Progressives is to go on making mistakes. The business of the Conservatives is to prevent the mistakes from being corrected.” ― G.K. Chesterton April 19, 1924

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Re: 2019 an election year

Postby floppi » Jan 10th, 2019, 7:55 am

d0nb wrote:
At least drunken sailors spend their own money. Imagine what would happen if they could just add their bills to the national debt.

As you say, unlike Harper, Trudeau hasn't faced a recession. He also hasn't been threatened by a coalition of losers who insist on massive increases in government spending. Even so, he has failed miserably in keeping his promise to hold his deficit spending to less than $30 billion and to balance the budget during his mandate. Instead, he will add over $70 billion to the debt and now admits that under the Liberals, Canada will suffer deficits for decades. Fail.


It didn't matter if Harper faced a recession or not, he was going to bungle the fix. If it wasn't for the mutiny of the other parties, he would have sunk us even worse than he did. Don't fool yourself, the main reason we came out relatively unscathed during that recession was because of Mark Carney and our Banking laws.....NOT HARPER!

On the morning of Dec. 1, 2008, Stephen Harper’s world could not have been more bleak.

His minority government faced imminent defeat by a Liberal-NDP coalition. If a confidence vote took place in the House of Commons, his tenure as prime minister would be less than three years.

Harper faced two choices: Accept defeat and hope to fight another day, as Opposition leader, or find some way to stop the coalition from taking power........Just weeks after winning a second minority government, Harper’s government had introduced an economic statement many felt didn’t address a widening global meltdown. Instead of focusing on the looming recession, it contained a plan to end public subsidies for political parties — a lightning rod to the opposition, which could be crippled by it.


Remember these years,

By 2011.............critics pointed to broken promises and troublesome compromises: Income trusts were taxed after Harper pledged they wouldn’t be; patronage appointments proceeded unencumbered; the combination of spending hikes and tax cuts led to the biggest deficit in history; a fixed-date election law was ignored; Quebecois were given special status, recognized as a “nation” within Canada; concern about China’s human-rights violations gave way to a trade agenda; and although Harper promised soldiers he would not “cut and run” from Afghanistan, he set an “end date” of July 2011 for the combat mission.


https://o.canada.com/news/national/stephen_harper_day4

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Re: 2019 an election year

Postby The Green Barbarian » Jan 10th, 2019, 9:43 am

floppi wrote:Remember these years,


Yes, I remember those years fondly. Such better leadership, such better government than we have now...
All evidence points to the snollygoster scown Justin Trudeau being unfit to run this country. The LIEberal platform is all foofrah. Don't be fooled by the LIEberal decepticons. October 2019 can't come fast enough.

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Re: 2019 an election year

Postby The Green Barbarian » Jan 10th, 2019, 9:54 am

hobbyguy wrote:
So here's your challenge GB - what $25 billion in programs are you going to cut?


Easy. Welfare to the able-bodied. Boom!!

Transfer payments to provinces like Quebec that should be self-sufficient. Boom!

Support (not all, just a few hundred million) for the CBC - Boom!!!

Any funding for Aboriginal reserves that refuse to be held accountable - Boom!

Any and all subsidies to the wind and solar industries - Boom!

Any funding whatsoever to anyone studying the man-made climate change myth. - Boom!

I'd also raise the GST back to 7%. But that's just me.

And no, don't pick about for your favorite right wing stuff.


You don't know me well enough to know what my "favorites" are and I don't respect you enough to rely on your definition of what constitutes "right wing stuff". This just sounds like an insanely stupid comment to me.

Give us a list that adds up to $25 billion and no less.


Easy. I can keep going too.

Then see if you can gt Scheer to run on that instead of smoke and mirrors nonsense.


The bunch of boobs he is running against are the ultimate definition of "smoke and mirrors nonsense" so he shouldn't have much of a problem.

Good luck! Scheer would get about 7% of the vote if he did that. So we will get the total nonsense about "fiscal conservatism" and "summit fer nuttin" CONservative fluffery and rubbish.


No, you will get this - CUT SPENDING YOU IDIOTIC DRUNKEN SAILOR LIBERAL BOOBS!! That's it.
All evidence points to the snollygoster scown Justin Trudeau being unfit to run this country. The LIEberal platform is all foofrah. Don't be fooled by the LIEberal decepticons. October 2019 can't come fast enough.

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Re: 2019 an election year

Postby Carrs Landing Viking » Jan 10th, 2019, 10:24 am

Transfer payments to Quebec amount to 13 billion this year alone. So not hard to cut 25 billion.

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Re: 2019 an election year

Postby Catsumi » Jan 10th, 2019, 10:27 am

Don't forget the Phoenix payroll system which has cost plenty with lots more to come. It should have been scrapped long ago.
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Success consists of going from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm. (W. Churchill)

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Re: 2019 an election year

Postby Brass Monkey » Jan 10th, 2019, 10:29 am

It is almost creepy how American that blue print for cuts looks like. Screw green energy, screw aboriginals, screw poor people, screw researching climate change (it scares petrol heads, riggers). Its almost like Trumps little brother that couldn't.
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Re: 2019 an election year

Postby Pete Podoski » Jan 10th, 2019, 10:30 am

Scott Brison resigns

The Canadian Press - Jan 10, 2019


Scott Brison is resigning from Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's cabinet after deciding he won't run for re-election this fall. After 22 years representing the Nova Scotia riding of Kings-Hants, Brison says he's ready for a change and looking forward to spending more time with his four-year-old twins.


https://www.castanet.net/news/Canada/24 ... on-resigns

Image
“Uh, we, uhuh, we have recently switched to drinking, uh, water bottles out of, uh, water out of, uh, when we have water bottles, uh, out of plastic, uh, sorry, away from plastic towards, uh, paper, um, like drink box water bottles sort of things.”

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Re: 2019 an election year

Postby floppi » Jan 10th, 2019, 10:40 am

Catsumi wrote:Don't forget the Phoenix payroll system which has cost plenty with lots more to come. It should have been scrapped long ago.


Oh yes how can we forget that:

It was one of the biggest IT boondoggles in Canadian government history, and it’s still going. The Phoenix payroll system was part of a federal government investment in consolidating and modernizing government processes.


2009

The Conservative government creates a plan to update existing 40-year-old payroll system. Part of the plan involves moving all payroll-related work to a new centre in Miramichi.

2011

The government awards the contract to update the service to IBM, which has proposed a PeopleSoft-based replacement payroll system.

March 2014

The Government takes over responsibility for Phoenix training design and execution from IBM, allegedly because it wanted to adopt a ‘train the trainer’ approach rather than follow IBM’s recommended system.

April 2015

Stephan Harper awards the contract for the construction of the Public Service Pay Centre in Miramichi, promising 500 jobs. It must serve the entire government’s payroll transactions by December.

May 2015

IBM recommends delaying the planned rollout of the Phoenix system, which was due to start at the end of that year due to critical problems with the system.

June 2015

Payroll staff at Miramichi, working in two temporary locations while they await construction of the new facility, say that they cannot keep up with complaints from people not getting paid.

They are handling 72,000 payroll files at this time and will have to handle 184,000 by October. “It’s just a matter of them learning their job and taking the time to process it,” says local MP Tilly O’Neil Gordon.

January 2016

Documents later obtained by the CBC show that senior officials knew in January about a flaw in Phoenix that allowed widespread access to employees’ personnel records. Up to 70,000 public servants had access to the personal details of 300,000 employees. Information about the flaw was purged from a Privacy Impact Assessment document, although the flaw persisted until at least April, the CBC said.
Related

Federal government encountered “unanticipated complexity” in rolling out payroll system

February 2016

The Canadian government lays off approximately 2,700 payroll clerks as it takes the Phoenix payroll system live across 34 government departments, serving 120,000 people. This is the first in a two-part rollout.

March 2016

March 9 is the first payday under the new system.

April 2016

The Public Service Alliance of Canada (PSAC) reports that thousands of its members are not getting paid under the new system. Government workers report of having to dip into their RRSPs to meet the gap. Spokespeople for PSPC say that they have received 300 formal complaints so far.

The government rolls out the second stage of the system, across 67 departments serving 170,000 employees, despite protests from public service unions. PSAC asks the government to switch back to the old system until it fixes the problems.

May 2016

240,000 employees are scheduled to be paid via Phoenix on May 4. Complaints emerge across the country of workers not being paid. Public Services and Procurement Canada blames other departments for not inputting paperwork properly.

June 2016

PSPC Minister Judy Foote calls the situation ‘unacceptable’ and says the department is hiring 100 employees at a temporary pay centre in Gatineau to help solve the problem.

PSAC argues that the government is breaking the law by not paying workers, and then promptly takes it to court.

July 2016

80,000 public sector workers have been affected by payment problems, and PSPC deputy minister Marie says that the backlog could cost $20m to fix, adding that they will not all be resolved before October. Reports emerge of some former public sector workers who cannot stop the government paying them under the new system. Prime Minister Trudeau calls the problem ‘unacceptable’ but says that it is inherited.

The government hires more workers in Miramichi, and its operations and estimates committee holds an emergency meeting to address reports of more people not being paid.

Lemay informs workers of two separate privacy breaches that occurred under the Phoenix system, one in 2015, and one in 2016.

August 2016

Foote revises a previous estimate of the cost to fix Phoenix, now pegging it at $25 million, but reaffirms a deadline of October 31 to address all technical issues.

September 2016

Marie Lemay again revises the cost of fixing the system, now estimating up to $50m. $6m of that will go to IBM for extra work on the project. There is still a backlog of 67,500 people with payment problems in the Canadian payroll system., but she promises to resolve them all by Oct 31.

IBM puts the blame for Phoenix at the Conservatives’ door, arguing that it took over responsibility for training and execution in March 2014.

October 2016

The government misses its self-imposed deadline for resolving its backlog of all outstanding payroll-related issues by Oct 31. 22,000 of the original 82,000 are unresolved.


.......then JT and the Libs inherits this piece of *bleep* implemented by the Harper government.....What a colossal waste of MONEY!!
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Re: 2019 an election year

Postby Catsumi » Jan 10th, 2019, 10:46 am

Totally agree. Complete waste of money never to be seen again.

So why hasn't it been scrapped under the Egghead gov't of present?
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Success consists of going from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm. (W. Churchill)

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Re: 2019 an election year

Postby floppi » Jan 10th, 2019, 10:48 am

It's too late and more costly to ditch it at this point. Too bad Harper isn't around to answer for the mess he caused....and it's not the only mess he made on his way out.
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Re: 2019 an election year

Postby The Green Barbarian » Jan 10th, 2019, 11:07 am

Brass Monkey wrote:It is almost creepy how American that blue print for cuts looks like. Screw green energy, screw aboriginals, screw poor people, screw researching climate change (it scares petrol heads, riggers). Its almost like Trumps little brother that couldn't.


How am I "screwing" Aboriginals? I expected a stupid comment like this from the brain-washed and those consumed by pure hatred and blinded by silliness. Why is asking for a minimum of accountability "screwing" them? Especially given so many asked for these kinds of accountability to be put in place! This is why I find your posts so ridiculous. You claim to be on the side of FN, and yet you seem to be bent solely on keeping them trapped in poverty and suffering. That I find just sad.

Screw researching climate change? No, the climate is always changing. It's good to know why. Just blaming any changes on fairy tales about mankind is bizarre, and a total waste of our resources.
All evidence points to the snollygoster scown Justin Trudeau being unfit to run this country. The LIEberal platform is all foofrah. Don't be fooled by the LIEberal decepticons. October 2019 can't come fast enough.

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Re: 2019 an election year

Postby The Green Barbarian » Jan 10th, 2019, 11:08 am

floppi wrote:It's too late and more costly to ditch it at this point. .


LOL - more excuses from the peanut-chucking Liberals.

The economy is doing great! It must all be the Liberals! There's a horrible money-wasting payroll program in place! It must be the Conservatives fault! It's just such hypocritical *bleep*, but what we've come to expect from the drunken sailor Liberals.
All evidence points to the snollygoster scown Justin Trudeau being unfit to run this country. The LIEberal platform is all foofrah. Don't be fooled by the LIEberal decepticons. October 2019 can't come fast enough.

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Re: 2019 an election year

Postby Catsumi » Jan 10th, 2019, 11:22 am

GB, the Lib party faithful must defend all the poor choices made. It's like watching monkeys stretching themselves to noodles reaching for plastic bananas. The effort forever a flop. Tsk tsk
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