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Re: Lyme disease-- Problem in the Okanagan?

PostPosted: Jan 24th, 2018, 7:03 am
by Fancy
Temet Nosce wrote:I know this thread is older now but TreeGuy if you don't mind sharing how did you eventually get diagnosed? I skimmed through and may have missed it in the thread but not sure how you finally got diagnosed.
Read his first post on page 3 - sums it up.
And this on page 4:
TreeGuy wrote:Just an update to this thread, not that it has gained much interest, however if it helps someone else then it is worth it. Through testing done in the USA I have been diagnosed with Lyme disease.

Re: Lyme disease-- Problem in the Okanagan?

PostPosted: Jan 24th, 2018, 7:14 am
by TreeGuy
Temet Nosce wrote:
TreeGuy wrote:Surprise, surprise, surprise! The more people I talk to about Lyme the more I hear from people who have it or have had it. I am out of pocket a good sum of money for the treatment I sought through Naturopathic Dr.'s, hopefully others in the future won't have to go through the same ordeal.

http://www.castanet.net/edition/news-story-165866-4-.htm#165866


I know this thread is older now but TreeGuy if you don't mind sharing how did you eventually get diagnosed? I skimmed through and may have missed it in the thread but not sure how you finally got diagnosed.


I saw Dr. Chan, a naturopathic Dr in Richmond. He did some in clinic testing and sent my blood down to the USA. It is a quantitative test and the numbers showed it was likely that I had Lyme, so I went on two different antibiotics.

After that I saw Dr Pagdin as I had adrenal fatigue. Now often major trauma can bring Lyme symptoms back. I don’t think breaking my neck will do that as I was on intravenous antibiotics in the hospital.

PM me if you would like to discuss it more.

Re: Lyme disease-- Problem in the Okanagan?

PostPosted: Jan 24th, 2018, 7:02 pm
by Temet Nosce
Sorry to hear your struggle and hope you are starting to feel better. Adrenal fatigue--not good. I am sure they must have also checked you for Addison's Disease after everything you've been through. Thank you for sharing and the info I appreciate that and :130: to your recovery.

Re: Lyme disease-- Problem in the Okanagan?

PostPosted: Apr 13th, 2018, 7:29 am
by Glacier
This was found in Vanderhoof last weekend. The poor moose that was here has been ravaged by ticks. They are bad this year, so please be aware and check yourself and pets regularly if you are out and about. Lyme disease is not fun to deal with as deer ticks are also being found.

ticks1.jpg

ticks2.jpg

ticks3.jpg

Re: Lyme disease-- Problem in the Okanagan?

PostPosted: Apr 13th, 2018, 7:46 am
by TreeGuy
Glacier wrote:This was found in Vanderhoof last weekend. The poor moose that was here has been ravaged by ticks. They are bad this year, so please be aware and check yourself and pets regularly if you are out and about. Lyme disease is not fun to deal with as deer ticks are also being found.

ticks1.jpg

ticks2.jpg

ticks3.jpg


I can testify to that!

Some believe mosquitos also carry lyme bacteria.

Re: Lyme disease-- Problem in the Okanagan?

PostPosted: May 6th, 2018, 8:54 am
by Catsumi
For those who are concerned about Lyme disease (we all should be aware) or who are so unfortunate as to actually have it,this is for you.

An excellent, clearly stated and easy to understand 20 min interview on CBC radio on The Sunday Edition, today.

The segment is titled "Lyme disease, the first epidemic of climate change"

The interviewee has just published a book with the same title. Hope this is of some help to those afflicted.

:biggrin:

Re: Lyme disease-- Problem in the Okanagan?

PostPosted: Jun 4th, 2018, 1:19 pm
by Glacier
Is Lyme disease a feminist issue? It may sound ludicrous to ask this of a tick-borne infection that can usually be dispatched with a course of antibiotics. Yet its name commemorates the two women living in the town of Lyme, Connecticut, who, in the mid-seventies, fought the medical establishment to have the disease acknowledged and treated. “You know,” a doctor informed one of them after failing to find the source of her symptoms, “sometimes people subconsciously want to be sick.” It’s tempting to think of this reflexive, paternalistic skepticism directed at female patients as a remnant of a bygone era. And yet there’s a class of illnesses—multi-symptomatic, chronic, hard to diagnose—that remain associated with suffering women and disbelieving experts. Lyme disease, symptoms of which can afflict patients years after the initial tick bite, appears to be one.

“I don’t care if people don’t think feminism is important, because I know it is,” the musician and early Riot Grrrl Kathleen Hanna says toward the end of “The Punk Singer,” Sini Anderson’s 2013 documentary about her. “And I don’t care if people don’t think late-stage Lyme disease exists, because I have it and other people have it. . . . If they don’t want to believe in it or they don’t want to care about it, that’s totally fine, but they should have to stay out of my way.” She describes an experience common to many sufferers from chronic illness—that of being dismissed as an unreliable witness to what is happening inside her. Since no single medical condition, a doctor once told her, could plausibly affect so many different systems—neurological, respiratory, gastrointestinal—she must be having a panic attack.


https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2018 ... -disbelief