All Things Trudeau, Chapter 2

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Gone_Fishin
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Re: All Things Trudeau, Chapter 2

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hobbyguy wrote: Dec 1st, 2021, 9:47 am
Gone_Fishin wrote: Dec 1st, 2021, 9:04 am Justin's pipeline in the middle of a multi-million dollar scandal.

Quelle surprise.

https://energeticcity.ca/2021/11/30/alb ... -tmx-camps
Actually if you read the article, the problem isn't with the TMX contract, it is with how the Alberta Utilities Commission regulates being in conflict with reconciliation efforts and ATCO trying to stick Alberta electricity consumers with unrelated costs.

The first part is a Jason Kenney problem (but an understandable one given the changing landscape) , the second part is an ATCO problem and is unrelated to the TMX other than it is there where the costs were incurred.

BC first nations do get some soul source contracts in BC precisely from the perspective of providing economic options and building economic capacity within FNs. That's fine, and as it should be as we try to balance out a fair shake for them. That ATCO tried to transfer that onto bills for Alberta utility customers is the problem.

That his zero to do with Trudeau, and just shows how ridiculous the Trudeau bashers can be.
Trudeau has culpability stuck to him like white on Rice with yet another scandal involving the public's money.
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Re: All Things Trudeau, Chapter 2

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Hurtlander wrote: Dec 1st, 2021, 6:41 am
You seem to forget, or deliberately fail to acknowledge, that there’s literally tens of thousands of Canadians that hate Trudeau with the fire of a thousand suns that aren’t CPC partisans in any way shape or form, many are disappointed and disillusioned Liberals, Dippers, Greens, BQ, or those with zero part affiliation… Some of whom post anti-Trudeau thoughts and opinions right here on this forum.. I guess it’s just easier for shallow thinkers to simply pigeon-hole everyone that speaks unkind words about the Trudeau Liberals as being CPC partisans.

I don’t believe anybody ever said that. But, intelligent people from every political persuasion and every walk of life fully understand that there’s a vast difference between the wealthy that earned their wealth through hard work and intelligence, and those that were born with a silver spoon in their mouths and a trust fund. The former understand the value of their hard earned wealth, the latter cluelessly thinks their money simply grows on trees.
Show me the "literally tens of thousands of Canadians that hate Trudeau...that aren't CPC partisans". I've said this on these boards before, but it bears repeating, I don't actually like Trudeau, I consider him to be a weak leader (although I see some signs of improvement in that dept), but I don't hate him. There is a vast difference between not liking him and actually hating him, I have never seen the kind of ferocious vitriol and venom that regularly pops up here from anyone who isn't a right-wing partisan.

As for wealth, your generalization that people who inherit wealth think money grows on trees is unfounded and pretty biased. In fact, many wealthy people work hard and use their intelligence and education to grow their fortunes. Very few individuals pull themselves up from the depths of poverty to the heights of fortune by their wits and work ethic, although it's a handy narrative if you want to reinforce the idea that the poor are poor because they're doing something wrong, most wealthy people start from comfortable backgrounds.
Last edited by Catri on Dec 1st, 2021, 1:16 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: All Things Trudeau, Chapter 2

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Catri wrote: Dec 1st, 2021, 12:53 pm most wealthy people start from comfortable backgrounds.
Like trust fund boy Justin, whose family fortune comes from PetroCan's purchase of Petrofina shares for an artificially high price, a direct order from Pierre Trudeau. The Trudeau family was heavily invested in Petrofina, and pocketed untold millions in that swindle. Pierre Trudeau did this with taxpayers' money to start PetroCan.

Ah, the greasy ways of the Trudeau family's ill-gotten wealth. Regular people would be thrown in jail for such malfeasance.

And the TMX? I'd bet on there being multiple scandals involving our money going to Trudeau's wealthy friends on that boondoggle.


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Re: All Things Trudeau, Chapter 2

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Catri wrote: Dec 1st, 2021, 12:53 pm
Hurtlander wrote: Dec 1st, 2021, 6:41 am
You seem to forget, or deliberately fail to acknowledge, that there’s literally tens of thousands of Canadians that hate Trudeau with the fire of a thousand suns that aren’t CPC partisans in any way shape or form, many are disappointed and disillusioned Liberals, Dippers, Greens, BQ, or those with zero part affiliation… Some of whom post anti-Trudeau thoughts and opinions right here on this forum.. I guess it’s just easier for shallow thinkers to simply pigeon-hole everyone that speaks unkind words about the Trudeau Liberals as being CPC partisans.

I don’t believe anybody ever said that. But, intelligent people from every political persuasion and every walk of life fully understand that there’s a vast difference between the wealthy that earned their wealth through hard work and intelligence, and those that were born with a silver spoon in their mouths and a trust fund. The former understand the value of their hard earned wealth, the latter cluelessly thinks their money simply grows on trees.
Show me the "literally tens of thousands of Canadians that hate Trudeau...that aren't CPC partisans". I've said this on these boards before, but it bears repeating, I don't actually like Trudeau, I consider him to be a weak leader (although I see some signs of improvement in that dept), but I don't hate him.
Same here. Although when I've criticized him, I've been accused of hating him.
Catri wrote:There is a vast difference between not liking him and actually hating him, I have never seen the kind of ferocious vitriol and venom that regularly pops up here from anyone who isn't a right-wing partisan.
There's also a measure of nastiness directed at people who simply think Trudeau should be held accountable.
Catri wrote:As for wealth, your generalization that people who inherit wealth think money grows on trees is unfounded and pretty biased. In fact, many wealthy people work hard and use their intelligence and education to grow their fortunes.
I agree with you here, too. However, Trudeau obviously isn't among these people who work hard and use their intelligence and education to grow their fortunes. Worse, because he has no clue about how budgets work and how inflation hurts people, he's causing a lot of harm by being in charge of something he doesn't truly have the capacity to understand.
Catri wrote:Very few individuals pull themselves up from the depths of poverty to the heights of fortune by their wits and work ethic, although it's a handy narrative if you want to reinforce the idea that the poor are poor because they're doing something wrong, most wealthy people start from comfortable backgrounds.
Now you're generalizing inappropriately. All of us know people who have pulled themselves up, all of us know people who have squandered.

Trudeau has no real experience with the problems of the middle classes, and as PM he has done plenty to make life more difficult for all of us. There's no guarantee someone with real experience with the problems of the middle classes would make less of a hash of it than he has done, but there's also no point pretending he is capable of genuinely understanding the damage he does.
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Re: All Things Trudeau, Chapter 2

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Now, if they were an Ultimate Frisbee Team, Coach Trudeau would be far more cooperative.
Trudeau government leaves Canadian girls field hockey team stranded in South Africa

https://westphaliantimes.com/trudeau-go ... uth-africa
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Re: All Things Trudeau, Chapter 2

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Sabrina Maddeaux with another brilliant article. Liberal shills to apologize on Justin's behalf and somehow blame Harper and the author of the article for this CPP debacle coming in in 4...3...2...1...
Sabrina Maddeaux: Thanks to Trudeau Liberals, working Canadians will pay too much into CPP

The cost of… well, basically, everything seems to be soaring, and now many Canadians can subtract one more price increase from their bank balances. The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) announced, last month, new maximum pensionable earnings for 2022. While small increases are typically expected, next year’s cap will jump a rather shocking 5.3 per cent to $64,900 from $61,600 in 2021. This is the fastest rate of increase in 30 years.
https://www.msn.com/en-ca/money/topstor ... d=msedgntp
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Re: All Things Trudeau, Chapter 2

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The Green Barbarian wrote: Dec 2nd, 2021, 1:16 pm Sabrina Maddeaux with another brilliant article. Liberal shills to apologize on Justin's behalf and somehow blame Harper and the author of the article for this CPP debacle coming in in 4...3...2...1...
Sabrina Maddeaux: Thanks to Trudeau Liberals, working Canadians will pay too much into CPP

The cost of… well, basically, everything seems to be soaring, and now many Canadians can subtract one more price increase from their bank balances. The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) announced, last month, new maximum pensionable earnings for 2022. While small increases are typically expected, next year’s cap will jump a rather shocking 5.3 per cent to $64,900 from $61,600 in 2021. This is the fastest rate of increase in 30 years.
https://www.msn.com/en-ca/money/topstor ... d=msedgntp
Don't worry, the money is going to Tiny Tim.

Well, maybe that should cause extreme worry.
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Re: All Things Trudeau, Chapter 2

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Gone_Fishin wrote: Dec 2nd, 2021, 1:36 pm
Don't worry, the money is going to Tiny Tim.

Well, maybe that should cause extreme worry.
Parachuting costs a lot of money these days apparently.
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Re: All Things Trudeau, Chapter 2

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The Green Barbarian wrote: Dec 2nd, 2021, 1:16 pm Sabrina Maddeaux with another brilliant article. Liberal shills to apologize on Justin's behalf and somehow blame Harper and the author of the article for this CPP debacle coming in in 4...3...2...1...
Sabrina Maddeaux: Thanks to Trudeau Liberals, working Canadians will pay too much into CPP

The cost of… well, basically, everything seems to be soaring, and now many Canadians can subtract one more price increase from their bank balances. The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) announced, last month, new maximum pensionable earnings for 2022. While small increases are typically expected, next year’s cap will jump a rather shocking 5.3 per cent to $64,900 from $61,600 in 2021. This is the fastest rate of increase in 30 years.
https://www.msn.com/en-ca/money/topstor ... d=msedgntp
Half truths and hyperbole from a short sighted person in a higher income category.

E.g. the $500 pension increase she alludes to is ONLY for seniors over 75, which will is overwhelmingly for women and completely necessary.

Yup, we know Conservatives don't like seniors, when in power they attacked the retirement age, pensions in general. The "all for me none for you" crowd hates government pension plans - because? They generally hate government to start with. Yet the reality is that for 60-70% of Canadians OAS and CPP are critical to their retirement incomes, especially as they are indexed to the CPI. For that 60-70% those governemnt pensions are NOT 1/3 of their retirement income, more like 60-100%.

Sabrina is being ageist and elitist and silly with her arguments. It is really simple for anyone with half a brain: IF you are lucky enough to to have the income for RRSP contribution and/or are making enough for your retirement, then simply deduct the increase in CPP from that total, and shift your portfolio to a slightly higher risk profile. In other words, make CPP part of the low risk small c conservative part of part of your portfolio. So if you were contributing $500 per month to RRSPs and planned on a 60/40 portfolio mix, then drop that to $350 and shift to a 70/30 portfolio mix. Easy peasy. End result: better as your retirement income will have a a larger defined portion that is CPI indexed, AND not one cent out of your pocket!!

But I guess that's far too much math the simplistic anti-government Conservatives like Sabrina.

Trudeau and the Liberals have done the right thing by improving CPP, but elitist right wingers just don't get it.
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Re: All Things Trudeau, Chapter 2

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The Green Barbarian wrote: Dec 2nd, 2021, 1:16 pm Sabrina Maddeaux with another brilliant article. Liberal shills to apologize on Justin's behalf and somehow blame Harper and the author of the article for this CPP debacle coming in in 4...3...2...1...
Sabrina Maddeaux: Thanks to Trudeau Liberals, working Canadians will pay too much into CPP

The cost of… well, basically, everything seems to be soaring, and now many Canadians can subtract one more price increase from their bank balances. The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) announced, last month, new maximum pensionable earnings for 2022. While small increases are typically expected, next year’s cap will jump a rather shocking 5.3 per cent to $64,900 from $61,600 in 2021. This is the fastest rate of increase in 30 years.
https://www.msn.com/en-ca/money/topstor ... d=msedgntp
You would think pampered boomers would be thankful that the PM makes sure that CPP doesn't go into bankruptcy......
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Re: All Things Trudeau, Chapter 2

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nucksRnum1 wrote: Dec 2nd, 2021, 5:31 pm

You would think pampered boomers would be thankful that the PM makes sure that CPP doesn't go into bankruptcy......
How is this massive raise in rates ensuring anything other than continued mismanagement by the Liberal party? Why not focus on trying to control inflation (caused by the Liberals and their never-ending printing press) rather than jacking up rates through the roof? Talk about lazy. And so so very stupid. For shame Justin!
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Re: All Things Trudeau, Chapter 2

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The Green Barbarian wrote: Dec 2nd, 2021, 5:36 pm
nucksRnum1 wrote: Dec 2nd, 2021, 5:31 pm

You would think pampered boomers would be thankful that the PM makes sure that CPP doesn't go into bankruptcy......
How is this massive raise in rates ensuring anything other than continued mismanagement by the Liberal party? Why not focus on trying to control inflation (caused by the Liberals and their never-ending printing press) rather than jacking up rates through the roof? Talk about lazy. And so so very stupid. For shame Justin!
Can't you figure out the math in my previous post? The improvement to CPP will cost most people nothing if they can do the simplest math, and in fact will be big boon in giving them guaranteed and indexed to the CPI income when they retire.

But then the Trudeau basher's favorite party, the party of stoopid, came out against the improved CPP, so it is just reflexive nonsense.

It isn't massive, and anyone contributing to RRSPs etc. will provide a quick and easy adjustment that takes nothing out of their pockets, and gives them a better rate of return guaranteed. Not many guaranteed investments out there, and certainly not many that are indexed to the CPI 20, 30 years down the road.

But that's the reality, and once again the critics of of Trudeau are demonstrating a lack of comprehension.
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Re: All Things Trudeau, Chapter 2

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John Ivison: 'We are bleeding capital' and that spells big trouble, report warns

The typical bank economist is so boring that a near-death experience would see someone else’s life flash before their eyes.

They are, by nature, irresolute – “on the one hand….but on the other.”

That is why a special report that emerged from National Bank Financial this week was so startling – a compelling, unequivocal look at Canada’s investment climate by chief economist, Stéfane Marion.

His conclusion: “We are bleeding capital.”

Statistics Canada released its latest figures for the country’s capital stock in 2020 two weeks ago, which suggested investment increased by 1.3 percent last year, down from 1.8 percent in 2019.

But those numbers include government investment in things like infrastructure. Marion stripped out public sector spending to look purely at private sector investment. He found for the first time on record, there was an absolute contraction in our capital stock, as new investment did not cover depreciation – a calamity for a small trading economy like Canada.

While he concedes that COVID played his part, Marion points out that the five-year moving average has seen private investment slowing year-on-year since 2015, when it grew at four percent.
https://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/canada/j ... d=msedgntp

So yesterday we had the news that the Liberals are totally destroying and mismanaging the CPP and now we have this. Canada is just so pooched, thanks to the unqualified children in the Liberal government. They are just so awful.
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Re: All Things Trudeau, Chapter 2

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The Green Barbarian wrote: Dec 3rd, 2021, 8:22 am
John Ivison: 'We are bleeding capital' and that spells big trouble, report warns

The typical bank economist is so boring that a near-death experience would see someone else’s life flash before their eyes.

They are, by nature, irresolute – “on the one hand….but on the other.”

That is why a special report that emerged from National Bank Financial this week was so startling – a compelling, unequivocal look at Canada’s investment climate by chief economist, Stéfane Marion.

His conclusion: “We are bleeding capital.”

Statistics Canada released its latest figures for the country’s capital stock in 2020 two weeks ago, which suggested investment increased by 1.3 percent last year, down from 1.8 percent in 2019.

But those numbers include government investment in things like infrastructure. Marion stripped out public sector spending to look purely at private sector investment. He found for the first time on record, there was an absolute contraction in our capital stock, as new investment did not cover depreciation – a calamity for a small trading economy like Canada.

While he concedes that COVID played his part, Marion points out that the five-year moving average has seen private investment slowing year-on-year since 2015, when it grew at four percent.
https://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/canada/j ... d=msedgntp

So yesterday we had the news that the Liberals are totally destroying and mismanaging the CPP and now we have this. Canada is just so pooched, thanks to the unqualified children in the Liberal government. They are just so awful.
No, your Skippy inspired attack line on CPP is just dumb nonsense and only works with math challenged CPCers.

As for the drop in capital investments by companies, that is neither uniquely Canadian nor attributable to government policy except that necessary pandemic restrictions have caused companies to cancel/eliminate capital investments due to pandemic effects . That drop in capital investment during a pandemic is a big duh! That the right wing CPCers are unable to understand that, puts them in Gomer territory.

https://www.journalofaccountancy.com/is ... demic.html

The coronavirus pandemic has disrupted companies' capital project plans, not only this year but most likely for the foreseeable future. This is likely to have consequences beyond the pandemic, because the way companies allocate capital and make investment decisions affects long-term shareholder value creation.

One CFO role in leading organizational sustainability is capital planning. Successfully fulfilling this key role requires risk management and performing analytical processes that predict capital decision implications.

The practical business approach builds advance capabilities to respond to negative-surprise events and protect business operations. In a crisis, preserving cash and cash flow, as well as sustaining or obtaining capital, becomes the highest priority.

Major capital investments such as acquisitions and stock buybacks generally cease soon after a crisis begins.[/b"

Once again the Trudeau bashers are guilty of "shoot, aim, ready".

Meanwhile policies that the Trudeau Liberals are pursuing are attracting capital aimed at the low carbon economic transition, and specifically in regard to their push for hydrogen development: https://www.theglobeandmail.com/politic ... -projects/

"An Australian mining giant has signed agreements with three Canadian Indigenous nations to determine the viability of building green hydrogen projects as the company attempts to reinvent itself as a supplier of clean renewable energy.

Fortescue Future Industries (FFI) sees Canada as potentially one of the largest sources of renewable energy in the world and is hoping to develop multiple large-scale green energy projects here.

“We have scouted over 60 countries in the last 18 months, looking for where there are strong renewable resources and governments that are supportive of the green hydrogen industry,” FFI chief executive officer Julie Shuttleworth said in an interview. “We think Canada is very attractive. It is resource-rich and there is a strong government support for decarbonizing.”

SNIP

“These are multibillion-dollar projects so we would aim to have some of the first projects producing green hydrogen by 2025,” she said. “We are trying to create green hydrogen projects for domestic consumption in Canada and then for export.”

So yup, companies are starting to see Canada as a prime place to invest for the economy of the future.

Capital will indeed start to flow again as the pandemic wanes (still a ways to go there yet) and is good to see that Trudeau Liberal policies are creating an environment that is attracting the right kind of investments for the future.
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Re: All Things Trudeau, Chapter 2

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https://www.cbc.ca/news/business/job-ga ... -1.6272113

"Canada added 154,000 jobs last month, pushing jobless rate down to pandemic low of 6%

Canada's economy now has almost 200,000 more jobs than it did before the pandemic"

SNIP

"There was good news on the wage front, too, as the data agency calculates that wages during November 2021 were 7.7 per cent higher than they were the same month two years ago, before the pandemic. That's an extra $2.18 an hour, on average, since the same period two years ago.

Workers on the whole are moving up the wage scale. The number of people making less than $12 an hour has fallen dramatically over the past two years, from more than a quarter of a million people before to just 165,000 people today. There are also fewer people making between $12 and $20 an hour, as that number has fallen from 5.1 million workers to just 4.4 million now.

Those salary bands are shrinking because people are moving up the pay scale. Those making between $20 and $30 an hour have grown from 4.9 million before to 5.2 million now, and the ranks of those in the highest band have swollen to more than 6.8 million people. That's more than a million more than there were before."

We aren't out of the pandemic yet, and already unemployment is down to the lowest level achieved during the bleak CPC years. The real economy, the one that you and I, everyday Canadians live in, seems to be doing quite well.

There are hotspots of trouble, like housing prices, but overall the "everyday Canadian" economy is looking pretty decent. Especially heartening is people moving into the middle class with higher wages.

Some credit can go to the Trudeau Liberals, but mostly it is a credit to Canadians and their resiliency in the face of the pandemic.
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